August 02, 2019
by Anna Kurian

NTFB Partner, Varidesk Wins Big at DCEO Magazine Nonprofit Awards

August 02, 2019
by Anna Kurian

Almost one year has passed since the North Texas Food Bank opened the doors of our Perot Family Campus in Plano. Since that time, the organization has seen a tremendous amount of positive change including hosting more than 41,000 volunteers at our new home. This exciting time would not be possible without the in-kind support of the team at VARIDESK who donated beautiful office furniture- including stand up desks- creating a vibrant, active work space for our team.

On August 1st, VARIDESK was honored for their generosity, winning DCEO Magazine’s 2019 Non Profit and Corporate Citizenship Award for the category of “In-Kind Services Provider.”

For the Food Bank, this support from VARIDESK was trasformative- the team created a custom layout to optimize the NTFB office area and helped set the stage for a collaborative work space.

Purchasing these high-quality products at cost would have been an investment of $250,000 or more. Thanks to VARIDESK, the Food Bank was able to instead use these funds to continue to meet our mission of providing access to healthy foods. With a $1 donation being the equivalent of 3 meals, the contribution from VARIDESK allowed the Food Bank to provide 750,000 meals to the community.

A huge thank you to D CEO Magazine and the Communities Foundation of North Texas for recognizing VARIDESK for their support of NTFB’s mission!

To see how VARIDESK helped create NTFB’s active work space at the Perot Family Campus in Plano, check out this video.

Anna Kurian is a Dallas native, and passionate about telling a good story. Alongside a talented team of Food Bankers, Anna is privileged to hear firsthand accounts of the impact the North Texas Food Bank and their partners make in the community. After work, Anna likes to hang out with her little family and play with her dog Pepper.

Almost one year has passed since the North Texas Food Bank opened the doors of our Perot Family Campus in Plano. Since that time, the organization has seen a tremendous amount of positive change including hosting more than 41,000 volunteers at our new home. This exciting time would not be possible without the in-kind support of the team at VARIDESK who donated beautiful office furniture- including stand up desks- creating a vibrant, active work space for our team.

On August 1st, VARIDESK was honored for their generosity, winning DCEO Magazine’s 2019 Non Profit and Corporate Citizenship Award for the category of “In-Kind Services Provider.”

For the Food Bank, this support from VARIDESK was trasformative- the team created a custom layout to optimize the NTFB office area and helped set the stage for a collaborative work space.

Purchasing these high-quality products at cost would have been an investment of $250,000 or more. Thanks to VARIDESK, the Food Bank was able to instead use these funds to continue to meet our mission of providing access to healthy foods. With a $1 donation being the equivalent of 3 meals, the contribution from VARIDESK allowed the Food Bank to provide 750,000 meals to the community.

A huge thank you to D CEO Magazine and the Communities Foundation of North Texas for recognizing VARIDESK for their support of NTFB’s mission!

To see how VARIDESK helped create NTFB’s active work space at the Perot Family Campus in Plano, check out this video.

Anna Kurian is a Dallas native, and passionate about telling a good story. Alongside a talented team of Food Bankers, Anna is privileged to hear firsthand accounts of the impact the North Texas Food Bank and their partners make in the community. After work, Anna likes to hang out with her little family and play with her dog Pepper.


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July 31, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

More than Food on the Table: Stories from NTFB’s Fall Newsletter

July 31, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Here is some food for thought: providing food-insecure neighbors with access to reliable, nutritious food is an investment in human potential.

In the fall issue of Around the Table, the North Texas Food Bank’s quarterly print and online newsletter, you’ll learn how your support has nourished and inspired Juani, Daniela, Gisela and many others.

Juani and her family frequently cannot afford healthy food, but because of your support, she selects fresh produce and other nutritious options from a client-choice pantry, and she worries less often. Daniela struggled to focus on her schoolwork when she was hungry; she now receives the nourishment needed to thrive in and outside the classroom. Soon after Gisela received food assistance from a local food pantry, she also started volunteering there as well; she wants to give back and help her fellow food-insecure neighbors.

For Juani, Daniela and Gisela – your support provides more than just food on the table. Their stories demonstrate what can be possible when hungry neighbors receive access to critical food assistance. When finding food is no longer a daily hurdle that must be crossed in order to survive, our neighbors can focus on other things. And as the summer comes to a close, and many in our community return to school, imagine what could be possible when hungry children receive the proper nutrition needed to fully focus their attention in the classroom on academic success.

To read more of Juani, Daniela and Gisela’s stories, and learn how you can help nourish human potential, click here to read the fall issue of Around the Table.

Here is some food for thought: providing food-insecure neighbors with access to reliable, nutritious food is an investment in human potential.

In the fall issue of Around the Table, the North Texas Food Bank’s quarterly print and online newsletter, you’ll learn how your support has nourished and inspired Juani, Daniela, Gisela and many others.

Juani and her family frequently cannot afford healthy food, but because of your support, she selects fresh produce and other nutritious options from a client-choice pantry, and she worries less often. Daniela struggled to focus on her schoolwork when she was hungry; she now receives the nourishment needed to thrive in and outside the classroom. Soon after Gisela received food assistance from a local food pantry, she also started volunteering there as well; she wants to give back and help her fellow food-insecure neighbors.

For Juani, Daniela and Gisela – your support provides more than just food on the table. Their stories demonstrate what can be possible when hungry neighbors receive access to critical food assistance. When finding food is no longer a daily hurdle that must be crossed in order to survive, our neighbors can focus on other things. And as the summer comes to a close, and many in our community return to school, imagine what could be possible when hungry children receive the proper nutrition needed to fully focus their attention in the classroom on academic success.

To read more of Juani, Daniela and Gisela’s stories, and learn how you can help nourish human potential, click here to read the fall issue of Around the Table.


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July 25, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Meet Morgan

July 25, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Morgan holds her healthy after-school meal.

Talk to a ten-year-old about field trips and fruit cups, and you’re likely to see a smile surface.

Next school year, Morgan will enter the fifth grade, and during her summer break, she attends a summer program in West Dallas. This out-of-school time program offers a space where children can take part in activities and receive meals during the summer months, so Morgan can focus on the important aspects of a childhood summer: playing tag and eating grapes.

“Some of my favorite foods that we get here are the hot dogs,” says Morgan. “And the corn too! I also like grapes, and how they have fruit cups here.”

Through a partnership with Morgan’s summer program, the North Texas Food Bank provides healthy foods for the children who attend during the summer as well as during the school year. Today in North Texas, one in six of our neighbors live in food-insecure households, and of these households, one in four is home to a child. The North Texas Food Bank partners with schools, social services programs and many other Partner Agencies throughout our 13-county service area to ensure hungry children in our community receive access to nutritious foods throughout the school year and summer months.

This summer, Morgan is excited for a field trip to the pool, and playing games with friends. She lights up when describing these summer activities and continues to beam as she shares her gratitude for the healthy food she receives.

“If we didn’t have that food – that would be a problem,” says Morgan. “A lot of us are hungry when we get here. So I thank you, because of that, we can have food if we are hungry.”

To learn how you can help nourish children like Morgan, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.

Morgan holds her healthy after-school meal.

Talk to a ten-year-old about field trips and fruit cups, and you’re likely to see a smile surface.

Next school year, Morgan will enter the fifth grade, and during her summer break, she attends a summer program in West Dallas. This out-of-school time program offers a space where children can take part in activities and receive meals during the summer months, so Morgan can focus on the important aspects of a childhood summer: playing tag and eating grapes.

“Some of my favorite foods that we get here are the hot dogs,” says Morgan. “And the corn too! I also like grapes, and how they have fruit cups here.”

Through a partnership with Morgan’s summer program, the North Texas Food Bank provides healthy foods for the children who attend during the summer as well as during the school year. Today in North Texas, one in six of our neighbors live in food-insecure households, and of these households, one in four is home to a child. The North Texas Food Bank partners with schools, social services programs and many other Partner Agencies throughout our 13-county service area to ensure hungry children in our community receive access to nutritious foods throughout the school year and summer months.

This summer, Morgan is excited for a field trip to the pool, and playing games with friends. She lights up when describing these summer activities and continues to beam as she shares her gratitude for the healthy food she receives.

“If we didn’t have that food – that would be a problem,” says Morgan. “A lot of us are hungry when we get here. So I thank you, because of that, we can have food if we are hungry.”

To learn how you can help nourish children like Morgan, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.


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July 15, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Nourishing our Neighbors with Nutritious Foods

July 15, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Research tells us that food insecurity and health issues often go hand-in-hand. Our neighbors who live in food-insecure households frequently share that healthy foods are too expensive, and simply not an available option. Imagine surviving on a diet that never included fruits or vegetables, or lean proteins and milk. The quality of the food you eat can impact your physical and mental health, so eating a balanced diet is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

At the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB), we know all too well that foods that are high in nutritional value are likely out of reach for our food-insecure neighbors. For that reason and others, we are committed to providing access to nutritious food to all our hungry neighbors. But access to nutritious food is just part of the problem. The NTFB also offers free culinary and nutrition education. We are dedicated to closing the hunger gap in North Texas through empowering our neighbors to experience better health and quality of life through access to nutritious foods, and through providing the knowledge and skills to select and prepare healthy meals.

With summer now in full effect, enjoy this recipe crafted by Feeding America that utilizes healthy ingredients for a refreshing summer treat.

Summer Sunshine Smoothie

Ingredients

Servings: 2

•             1 cup low-fat milk

•             ½ cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

•             1 nectarine, sliced

•             1 banana, broken in half

•             ½ cup carrots – frozen, canned, or shredded fresh

•             1 cup ice cubes

Instructions

1.            Place all ingredients in a blender.

2.            Blend until smooth, adding more milk or ice as needed.

3.            Enjoy!

*Tip: Use what you have! If you don’t have carrots, try fresh spinach or cooked sweet potatoes. You can also replace vanilla yogurt with plain or strawberry yogurt.

Nutrition per serving: 198 calories, 9g protein, 2g fat, 38g carbohydrates, 3.5g fiber, 114mg sodium

To find more healthy recipes from Feeding America, click here.

Research tells us that food insecurity and health issues often go hand-in-hand. Our neighbors who live in food-insecure households frequently share that healthy foods are too expensive, and simply not an available option. Imagine surviving on a diet that never included fruits or vegetables, or lean proteins and milk. The quality of the food you eat can impact your physical and mental health, so eating a balanced diet is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

At the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB), we know all too well that foods that are high in nutritional value are likely out of reach for our food-insecure neighbors. For that reason and others, we are committed to providing access to nutritious food to all our hungry neighbors. But access to nutritious food is just part of the problem. The NTFB also offers free culinary and nutrition education. We are dedicated to closing the hunger gap in North Texas through empowering our neighbors to experience better health and quality of life through access to nutritious foods, and through providing the knowledge and skills to select and prepare healthy meals.

With summer now in full effect, enjoy this recipe crafted by Feeding America that utilizes healthy ingredients for a refreshing summer treat.

Summer Sunshine Smoothie

Ingredients

Servings: 2

•             1 cup low-fat milk

•             ½ cup low-fat vanilla yogurt

•             1 nectarine, sliced

•             1 banana, broken in half

•             ½ cup carrots – frozen, canned, or shredded fresh

•             1 cup ice cubes

Instructions

1.            Place all ingredients in a blender.

2.            Blend until smooth, adding more milk or ice as needed.

3.            Enjoy!

*Tip: Use what you have! If you don’t have carrots, try fresh spinach or cooked sweet potatoes. You can also replace vanilla yogurt with plain or strawberry yogurt.

Nutrition per serving: 198 calories, 9g protein, 2g fat, 38g carbohydrates, 3.5g fiber, 114mg sodium

To find more healthy recipes from Feeding America, click here.


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July 12, 2019
by Anna Kurian

NTFB Celebrates Annual RyanShares day with special volunteer effort

July 12, 2019
by Anna Kurian
Team members from Ryan- the world’s largest firm dedicated exclusively to business tax services- rolled up their sleeves at the North Texas Food Bank, working to box and sort food in celebration of RyanShares day, the firms annual day of service.

With a rally cry of “Generosity Matters,” a dedicated team from Ryan spent their day working to do some good in the community. The team assembled at the North Texas Food Bank on June 12 in celebration of RyanShares Day, the firm’s annual day of service.

This effort locally is part of a global initiative that includes 2,500 employees spending the day volunteering in their local communities.

While at the Food Bank, the Ryan team helped to box and sort food, destined to feed hungry people across North Texas. All told the team helped create more than 63,000 meals- all in a days work! This help couldn’t come at a better time, as the summer is known as the hungriest season- a time when children are out of school and don’t have access to school meals, and rising temperatures are met with rising utility costs.

This isn’t the first time that the team at Ryan has stepped up to make a difference- with this year’s effort serving as the 4th annual sorting event at the NTFB. With a core value of “Generosity Matters,” the firm encourages employees to connect on a personal level to touch lives and make a difference in their communities, the Ryan team has donated, food, time and funds to ensure that North Texans have the healthy foods they need to thrive.

Our team is fortunate to have the support of the Ryan team among our leadership; Global President and Chief Operating Officer of Ryan Ginny B. Kissling, sits on the board of directors for the North Texas Food Bank. She donates her time, expertise and passion to support our mission and the hungry neighbors that we serve.

It is clear that it takes a community to ensure that all of our hungry neighbors are fed. We salute the Ryan team for their hard work and dedication, North Texas is a better place thanks to their efforts!

Team members from Ryan- the world’s largest firm dedicated exclusively to business tax services- rolled up their sleeves at the North Texas Food Bank, working to box and sort food in celebration of RyanShares day, the firms annual day of service.

With a rally cry of “Generosity Matters,” a dedicated team from Ryan spent their day working to do some good in the community. The team assembled at the North Texas Food Bank on June 12 in celebration of RyanShares Day, the firm’s annual day of service.

This effort locally is part of a global initiative that includes 2,500 employees spending the day volunteering in their local communities.

While at the Food Bank, the Ryan team helped to box and sort food, destined to feed hungry people across North Texas. All told the team helped create more than 63,000 meals- all in a days work! This help couldn’t come at a better time, as the summer is known as the hungriest season- a time when children are out of school and don’t have access to school meals, and rising temperatures are met with rising utility costs.

This isn’t the first time that the team at Ryan has stepped up to make a difference- with this year’s effort serving as the 4th annual sorting event at the NTFB. With a core value of “Generosity Matters,” the firm encourages employees to connect on a personal level to touch lives and make a difference in their communities, the Ryan team has donated, food, time and funds to ensure that North Texans have the healthy foods they need to thrive.

Our team is fortunate to have the support of the Ryan team among our leadership; Global President and Chief Operating Officer of Ryan Ginny B. Kissling, sits on the board of directors for the North Texas Food Bank. She donates her time, expertise and passion to support our mission and the hungry neighbors that we serve.

It is clear that it takes a community to ensure that all of our hungry neighbors are fed. We salute the Ryan team for their hard work and dedication, North Texas is a better place thanks to their efforts!


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July 09, 2019
by Trisha Cunningham

The North Texas Food Bank Remembers H. Ross Perot Sr.

July 09, 2019
by Trisha Cunningham

The North Texas Food Bank mourns the loss of H. Ross Perot Sr., a true trailblazer with a heart larger than the Lone Star State. He leaves a legacy marked by hard work, innovation and especially kindness.

Ross Perot Sr., pictured with his wife Margot and daughters at the grand opening festivities for the North Texas Food Bank Perot Family Campus.

The history of the NTFB is woven with contributions from the Perot family. The Perot Foundation helped secure the warehouse for our very first facility on Cockrell Hill Road in Southwest Dallas.

In 2015, when the Food Bank embarked on a capital campaign, Stop Hunger Build Hope,Ross Perot Sr., alongside his wife and 5 children provided a generous contribution to the campaign. This act of kindness allowed the Food Bank to open a state-of-the-art volunteer and distribution center in Plano, which proudly bears the name, the Perot Family Campus. Their gift also enabled key investments into the NTFB’s Partner Agency Feeding Network, all in an effort to get more healthy foods to our neighbors in need.

The desire to give back to the community is evident by his many good works. From a young age, philanthropy was a priority, as a boy, an ‘X’ marked on the curb outside his family home, signified a pledge to feed anyone passing by who was hungry.

That selflessness launched a longstanding and multi-generational commitment to hunger-relief, one that is showcased at the NTFB Perot Family Campus. The NTFB recently unveiled our own ‘X,’ a giant sculpture outside our new home that tells the community that this is also a place where hungry people can get the help they need.

The Perot family asked the Food Bank team to set up a special page where the community could come to make a gift in memory of Ross Perot Sr. To honor this tremendous legacy, please visit ntfb.org/perot

It is clear that North Texas is a better place thanks to the generosity of Ross Perot Sr., and his family. As we mourn this loss, the Food Bank team pledges to honor the memory of Ross Perot Sr., by fulfilling our promise to close the hunger gap in North Texas, working to provide 92 million meals by 2025.

In remembrance,

Trisha Cunningham

President and CEO

North Texas Food Bank

The North Texas Food Bank mourns the loss of H. Ross Perot Sr., a true trailblazer with a heart larger than the Lone Star State. He leaves a legacy marked by hard work, innovation and especially kindness.

Ross Perot Sr., pictured with his wife Margot and daughters at the grand opening festivities for the North Texas Food Bank Perot Family Campus.

The history of the NTFB is woven with contributions from the Perot family. The Perot Foundation helped secure the warehouse for our very first facility on Cockrell Hill Road in Southwest Dallas.

In 2015, when the Food Bank embarked on a capital campaign, Stop Hunger Build Hope,Ross Perot Sr., alongside his wife and 5 children provided a generous contribution to the campaign. This act of kindness allowed the Food Bank to open a state-of-the-art volunteer and distribution center in Plano, which proudly bears the name, the Perot Family Campus. Their gift also enabled key investments into the NTFB’s Partner Agency Feeding Network, all in an effort to get more healthy foods to our neighbors in need.

The desire to give back to the community is evident by his many good works. From a young age, philanthropy was a priority, as a boy, an ‘X’ marked on the curb outside his family home, signified a pledge to feed anyone passing by who was hungry.

That selflessness launched a longstanding and multi-generational commitment to hunger-relief, one that is showcased at the NTFB Perot Family Campus. The NTFB recently unveiled our own ‘X,’ a giant sculpture outside our new home that tells the community that this is also a place where hungry people can get the help they need.

The Perot family asked the Food Bank team to set up a special page where the community could come to make a gift in memory of Ross Perot Sr. To honor this tremendous legacy, please visit ntfb.org/perot

It is clear that North Texas is a better place thanks to the generosity of Ross Perot Sr., and his family. As we mourn this loss, the Food Bank team pledges to honor the memory of Ross Perot Sr., by fulfilling our promise to close the hunger gap in North Texas, working to provide 92 million meals by 2025.

In remembrance,

Trisha Cunningham

President and CEO

North Texas Food Bank


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July 03, 2019
by Trisha Cunningham

Standing with our Neighbors when the Storms Hit

July 03, 2019
by Trisha Cunningham

Recently violent storms wreaked havoc in North Texas, causing major destruction throughout our 13-county service area. Many in our community suffered damage to their homes and businesses, and hundreds of thousands were without power for several days. Repairing storm-ravaged structures and removing debris is still underway, but some of the most impactful damage is not what happened outside – but inside many of our neighbors’ homes.

With the power out, so too were our neighbors’ refrigerators and freezers, and perishable food will only keep for so long before spoiling and becoming unsafe to eat. For a family surviving on a budget stretched thin, losing the entire contents of a refrigerator and freezer can be devastating. A family’s supply of proteins, fruits and vegetables, all lost in a matter of days. Following the storm, neighbors without power likely survived on items from their cabinets and pantries. These shelf-stable items must be replenished as well.

For just about anyone, restocking a refrigerator, freezer and pantry carries a financial toll. Now consider that food-insecure neighbors already carry a financial burden. Combine this reality with the fact that foods that are high in nutritional value are typically more expensive, but can be less accessible for neighbors residing in areas of high need. Such communities often lack traditional grocery stores or require some travel to reach, which can be difficult for neighbors with limited mobility. For these reasons, food-insecure neighbors will often purchase foods that are inexpensive, and likely provide little nutritional value.

The recent storms that hit North Texas provided an opportunity to better understand and emphasize the hard reality that crisis effects our community at vastly different degrees. This instance gives a snapshot of the spiral that can occur when a food-insecure family faces unexpected turmoil. When neighbors must quickly prioritize and decide what is most critical: purchasing food, paying for utilities or medicine, or gas for a commute to work or school.

Regardless of cause or circumstance, the North Texas Food Bank is prepared to provide access to nutritious food to all our hungry neighbors. This past year, our team has provided a swift response following unforeseen events that resulted in an increased need for food assistance. Not only are we, along with our vast feeding network of Partner Agencies, able to provide access to food assistance, but providing access to nutritious foods is a top priority.

In the next few months, the Food Bank will celebrate our one year anniversary of opening the new Perot Family Campus. Among many new innovations and enhancements, this facility has empowered our ability to provide rapid relief when needed. To all our hungry neighbors repairing their storm damaged homes and restocking their refrigerators and freezers – the North Texas Food Bank stands with you. To all our neighbors who stand with us, and help us provide nutritious food to our neighbors, thank you. With your support, when the next storm hits or tragedy should occur, we will be ready and prepared to feed our hungry neighbors.

With Gratitude,

Trisha

President and CEO, North Texas Food Bank


Trisha Cunningham, President and CEO

Trisha Cunningham is President and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) and is leading the fight against hunger in North Texas. Trisha and her team of 170 employees and 40,000 volunteers work with more than 230 partner agencies to provide access to nearly 72 million meals annually. For more than 30 years, Trisha has served her community in various capacities, most recently as Chief Citizenship Officer at Texas Instruments (TI). Her commitment to nourishing her neighbors is evident in her vast civic involvement, and when she is not volunteering her time in the community, she can be found with her husband Greg, and their two children, Chris and Carrie. 

Recently violent storms wreaked havoc in North Texas, causing major destruction throughout our 13-county service area. Many in our community suffered damage to their homes and businesses, and hundreds of thousands were without power for several days. Repairing storm-ravaged structures and removing debris is still underway, but some of the most impactful damage is not what happened outside – but inside many of our neighbors’ homes.

With the power out, so too were our neighbors’ refrigerators and freezers, and perishable food will only keep for so long before spoiling and becoming unsafe to eat. For a family surviving on a budget stretched thin, losing the entire contents of a refrigerator and freezer can be devastating. A family’s supply of proteins, fruits and vegetables, all lost in a matter of days. Following the storm, neighbors without power likely survived on items from their cabinets and pantries. These shelf-stable items must be replenished as well.

For just about anyone, restocking a refrigerator, freezer and pantry carries a financial toll. Now consider that food-insecure neighbors already carry a financial burden. Combine this reality with the fact that foods that are high in nutritional value are typically more expensive, but can be less accessible for neighbors residing in areas of high need. Such communities often lack traditional grocery stores or require some travel to reach, which can be difficult for neighbors with limited mobility. For these reasons, food-insecure neighbors will often purchase foods that are inexpensive, and likely provide little nutritional value.

The recent storms that hit North Texas provided an opportunity to better understand and emphasize the hard reality that crisis effects our community at vastly different degrees. This instance gives a snapshot of the spiral that can occur when a food-insecure family faces unexpected turmoil. When neighbors must quickly prioritize and decide what is most critical: purchasing food, paying for utilities or medicine, or gas for a commute to work or school.

Regardless of cause or circumstance, the North Texas Food Bank is prepared to provide access to nutritious food to all our hungry neighbors. This past year, our team has provided a swift response following unforeseen events that resulted in an increased need for food assistance. Not only are we, along with our vast feeding network of Partner Agencies, able to provide access to food assistance, but providing access to nutritious foods is a top priority.

In the next few months, the Food Bank will celebrate our one year anniversary of opening the new Perot Family Campus. Among many new innovations and enhancements, this facility has empowered our ability to provide rapid relief when needed. To all our hungry neighbors repairing their storm damaged homes and restocking their refrigerators and freezers – the North Texas Food Bank stands with you. To all our neighbors who stand with us, and help us provide nutritious food to our neighbors, thank you. With your support, when the next storm hits or tragedy should occur, we will be ready and prepared to feed our hungry neighbors.

With Gratitude,

Trisha

President and CEO, North Texas Food Bank


Trisha Cunningham, President and CEO

Trisha Cunningham is President and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) and is leading the fight against hunger in North Texas. Trisha and her team of 170 employees and 40,000 volunteers work with more than 230 partner agencies to provide access to nearly 72 million meals annually. For more than 30 years, Trisha has served her community in various capacities, most recently as Chief Citizenship Officer at Texas Instruments (TI). Her commitment to nourishing her neighbors is evident in her vast civic involvement, and when she is not volunteering her time in the community, she can be found with her husband Greg, and their two children, Chris and Carrie. 


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June 24, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Partner Agency Spotlight: CitySquare

June 24, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Glenn shops for food at the CitySquare Food Pantry, a member of the North Texas Food Bank’s Feeding Network of Partner Agencies. He also volunteers there regularly.

Food banks are powered through collaboration, and without the collective support and partnership from many, the North Texas Food Bank would be unable to provide access to more than 190,000 meals each day to our hungry neighbors in need. Within our 13-county service area, our united team of hunger fighters is bound by the belief that our neighbors do not have to be hungry, and through our efforts, together, we can end hunger.

Our collaboration and partnership with CitySquare demonstrates what is possible when our hungry neighbors receive the nourishment needed to plan beyond finding their next meal. Many neighbors who first came to CitySquare for food assistance, have since sought other CitySquare support services from job training to housing and healthcare.

During a recent visit to the CitySquare Food Pantry, we met Glenn, who wanted to share his experience. Throughout his life, Glenn has struggled with health issues, and has often had difficulty paying for both medicine and nutritious foods.  

“I just don’t have enough money to pay for it all. And instead of just eating rice and beans, and stuff like that, I’m able to eat other healthy foods too. Thankfully, the other day I was able to get cases of eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash and peppers. I was able to make casseroles and put them in the freezer to have even more meals.”

At the CitySquare Food Pantry, it’s not uncommon to see neighbors who just shopped for food from the pantry, put on a volunteer vest, and help their fellow neighbors. Glenn also volunteers in the pantry and aims to share encouragement when he can. Like so many neighbors, CitySquare has provided him critical support, and he is thankful for the opportunity to express his gratitude.

“I come in, volunteer, and I’m walking people through when they shop. We have a good time. We joke around, dance, and it’s a lot of fun.”

To learn more about the North Texas Food Bank’s Feeding Network of Partner Agencies, or how you can help neighbors like Glenn, visit www.ntfb.org.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.

Glenn shops for food at the CitySquare Food Pantry, a member of the North Texas Food Bank’s Feeding Network of Partner Agencies. He also volunteers there regularly.

Food banks are powered through collaboration, and without the collective support and partnership from many, the North Texas Food Bank would be unable to provide access to more than 190,000 meals each day to our hungry neighbors in need. Within our 13-county service area, our united team of hunger fighters is bound by the belief that our neighbors do not have to be hungry, and through our efforts, together, we can end hunger.

Our collaboration and partnership with CitySquare demonstrates what is possible when our hungry neighbors receive the nourishment needed to plan beyond finding their next meal. Many neighbors who first came to CitySquare for food assistance, have since sought other CitySquare support services from job training to housing and healthcare.

During a recent visit to the CitySquare Food Pantry, we met Glenn, who wanted to share his experience. Throughout his life, Glenn has struggled with health issues, and has often had difficulty paying for both medicine and nutritious foods.  

“I just don’t have enough money to pay for it all. And instead of just eating rice and beans, and stuff like that, I’m able to eat other healthy foods too. Thankfully, the other day I was able to get cases of eggplant, zucchini, yellow squash and peppers. I was able to make casseroles and put them in the freezer to have even more meals.”

At the CitySquare Food Pantry, it’s not uncommon to see neighbors who just shopped for food from the pantry, put on a volunteer vest, and help their fellow neighbors. Glenn also volunteers in the pantry and aims to share encouragement when he can. Like so many neighbors, CitySquare has provided him critical support, and he is thankful for the opportunity to express his gratitude.

“I come in, volunteer, and I’m walking people through when they shop. We have a good time. We joke around, dance, and it’s a lot of fun.”

To learn more about the North Texas Food Bank’s Feeding Network of Partner Agencies, or how you can help neighbors like Glenn, visit www.ntfb.org.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.


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June 12, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Relief After the Storm

June 12, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
NTFB volunteers and staff distribute emergency food assistance to neighbors impacted by the storm that swept through North Texas on Sunday, June 9.

On Sunday, June 9, a severe storm violently swept through North Texas, causing widespread damage and leaving several hundred thousand neighbors in our community without power. Record high winds resulted in vast destruction to homes and businesses, loss of life and numerous injuries have been reported. Now just a few days later, the damage continues to be assessed, while many neighbors work to clean up our community and face the reality of a multi-day power outage: discarding spoiled food.

At the North Texas Food Bank, we extend our sincere condolences to our neighbors who have been impacted by Sunday’s storm. During this time, and always, we are committed to extending food assistance to all our hungry neighbors. Many in our community have lost the entire contents of their refrigerators and freezers that have been off for several days. In areas that lack traditional grocery stores, we were proud to be able to offer our Mobile Pantry as a resource to impacted residents.

The Food Bank continues to work alongside our city officials to provide emergency food assistance to our neighbors affected by the power outage. Our vast network of Partner Agencies is prepared to provide additional relief assistance to our neighbors who are in critical need of fresh fruit, produce, meat and dairy products. To find a partner agency food pantry or other resources in your neighborhood, visit www.ntfb.org/agencies.

Following a natural disaster, the collective support from our community is more critical than ever. Thousands of our neighbors have lost all perishable food, and for many, this loss has led to the depletion of other food supplies that must also be replenished. Countless neighbors are now experiencing an unforeseen financial burden to a budget that is already stretched thin. To help the North Texas Food Bank feed our hungry neighbors, and empower our ability to provide a nimble response following any period of crisis, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved. Together, we can support our neighbors in need.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.

NTFB volunteers and staff distribute emergency food assistance to neighbors impacted by the storm that swept through North Texas on Sunday, June 9.

On Sunday, June 9, a severe storm violently swept through North Texas, causing widespread damage and leaving several hundred thousand neighbors in our community without power. Record high winds resulted in vast destruction to homes and businesses, loss of life and numerous injuries have been reported. Now just a few days later, the damage continues to be assessed, while many neighbors work to clean up our community and face the reality of a multi-day power outage: discarding spoiled food.

At the North Texas Food Bank, we extend our sincere condolences to our neighbors who have been impacted by Sunday’s storm. During this time, and always, we are committed to extending food assistance to all our hungry neighbors. Many in our community have lost the entire contents of their refrigerators and freezers that have been off for several days. In areas that lack traditional grocery stores, we were proud to be able to offer our Mobile Pantry as a resource to impacted residents.

The Food Bank continues to work alongside our city officials to provide emergency food assistance to our neighbors affected by the power outage. Our vast network of Partner Agencies is prepared to provide additional relief assistance to our neighbors who are in critical need of fresh fruit, produce, meat and dairy products. To find a partner agency food pantry or other resources in your neighborhood, visit www.ntfb.org/agencies.

Following a natural disaster, the collective support from our community is more critical than ever. Thousands of our neighbors have lost all perishable food, and for many, this loss has led to the depletion of other food supplies that must also be replenished. Countless neighbors are now experiencing an unforeseen financial burden to a budget that is already stretched thin. To help the North Texas Food Bank feed our hungry neighbors, and empower our ability to provide a nimble response following any period of crisis, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved. Together, we can support our neighbors in need.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.


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June 06, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Closing the Summer Meal Gap for Students

June 06, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

It’s now summer in North Texas, and most students are out of school for the next few months. In preparation for this break from the classroom, educators often warn about summer slide, a decline in academic skills that can occur during summer break. But for many students, summer means both a break from academics and also from school-provided meals. Throughout our community, the absence of academics and critical nourishment is likely to result in a population of students who not only endure a summer of hunger but lose some achievement gains made during the previous school year.

During the summer months, the North Texas Food Bank continues to provide access to nutritious meals to food-insecure students and their families through our strategic programs as well as via our vast network of more than 200 Partner Agencies. We are also proud to promote the work of our partners at the Texas Department of Agriculture.

To help close the summer meal gap and provide summer programming for food-insecure students, the Texas Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) provides children and teens ages 18 years old and younger with free, nutritious meals in a welcoming environment. SFSP meal sites are located in areas where more than 50 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals in the National School Lunch Program. Last summer alone, this critical program distributed 15.5 million meals at various sites throughout the state, with most sites also offering activities to keep students engaged and academically stimulated.

To find a nearby Summer Food Service Program meal site, you can:

Summer food programs help students succeed by providing the nourishment they need to return to school in the fall ready to thrive in and outside the classroom. To learn how you can help end summer hunger, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.

It’s now summer in North Texas, and most students are out of school for the next few months. In preparation for this break from the classroom, educators often warn about summer slide, a decline in academic skills that can occur during summer break. But for many students, summer means both a break from academics and also from school-provided meals. Throughout our community, the absence of academics and critical nourishment is likely to result in a population of students who not only endure a summer of hunger but lose some achievement gains made during the previous school year.

During the summer months, the North Texas Food Bank continues to provide access to nutritious meals to food-insecure students and their families through our strategic programs as well as via our vast network of more than 200 Partner Agencies. We are also proud to promote the work of our partners at the Texas Department of Agriculture.

To help close the summer meal gap and provide summer programming for food-insecure students, the Texas Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) provides children and teens ages 18 years old and younger with free, nutritious meals in a welcoming environment. SFSP meal sites are located in areas where more than 50 percent of students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals in the National School Lunch Program. Last summer alone, this critical program distributed 15.5 million meals at various sites throughout the state, with most sites also offering activities to keep students engaged and academically stimulated.

To find a nearby Summer Food Service Program meal site, you can:

Summer food programs help students succeed by providing the nourishment they need to return to school in the fall ready to thrive in and outside the classroom. To learn how you can help end summer hunger, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.


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