January 17, 2014
by ntfbadmin

FOOD STAMP CUTS CREATE HIGHER DEMAND FOR LOCAL FOOD BANKS

January 17, 2014
by ntfbadmin

Care to learn more about the faces of hunger? In Kentucky, Rosanna Troyer is coping with the reduction of her food stamp help funding from $367 to $303 by cutting back on meat purchases and buying more canned goods and macaroni and cheese.

Rosanna’s 12-year-old daughter is already sick of the hot dogs they’ve been eating frequently at their home in Owsley County, which has the lowest median household income of any U.S. county outside Puerto Rico.

“She says ‘mom, can’t we have something else?’ I told her, you got to wait, maybe next month,” said Rosanna.

Rosanna Troyer is one of the more than 47 million Americans who receive food stamp help, all of whom saw their allotment drop last year as a temporary benefit from the 2009 economic stimulus ran out.

Unfortunately, many families in North Texas are experiencing the same difficulties as Rosanna Troyer. Starting Nov. 1 of last year, SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), or food stamp help, was cut by 5 percent. That’s $36 a month for a family of four. Local food banks in Dallas are bracing for more people lining up at local pantries.

The decrease in SNAP outreach benefits is the end of stimulus money approved in 2009 to increase benefits and help low-income families weather the recession.

NTFB’s Jan Pruitt is acting vigorously to alleviate the SNAP cuts’ effect. “We are trying to get ahead of this curve, and with the SNAP cuts adding to the line at a time when we’re struggling to get ahead of the curve, it’s just nearly impossible,” Pruitt said.

Jan Pruitt’s biggest concern is providing enough for the increased demand. It’s projected that SNAP cuts will affect 463,000 people in the food bank’s 13-county area, the majority of which are children, seniors and disabled North Texans. And it’s likely to get worse as Congress wrangles over how much to cut SNAP in the new Farm Bill.

Despite the increased plight of hunger as a result of SNAP cuts, the good news is this – you can help your fellow North Texans who are hungry today!

Donate by clicking above to make a difference for hungry North Texans

Donate by clicking above to make a difference for hungry North Texans

North Texas Food Bank is working diligently to see to it that no North Texans go hungry this year, but we desperately need your help. If you find hunger as unacceptable as our passionate staff and the other members of Feeding America do, all you have to do to help is volunteer your time, donate food, or simply donate your financial resources. Just ONE DOLLAR feeds THREE people!

Back to all posts.

Care to learn more about the faces of hunger? In Kentucky, Rosanna Troyer is coping with the reduction of her food stamp help funding from $367 to $303 by cutting back on meat purchases and buying more canned goods and macaroni and cheese.

Rosanna’s 12-year-old daughter is already sick of the hot dogs they’ve been eating frequently at their home in Owsley County, which has the lowest median household income of any U.S. county outside Puerto Rico.

“She says ‘mom, can’t we have something else?’ I told her, you got to wait, maybe next month,” said Rosanna.

Rosanna Troyer is one of the more than 47 million Americans who receive food stamp help, all of whom saw their allotment drop last year as a temporary benefit from the 2009 economic stimulus ran out.

Unfortunately, many families in North Texas are experiencing the same difficulties as Rosanna Troyer. Starting Nov. 1 of last year, SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), or food stamp help, was cut by 5 percent. That’s $36 a month for a family of four. Local food banks in Dallas are bracing for more people lining up at local pantries.

The decrease in SNAP outreach benefits is the end of stimulus money approved in 2009 to increase benefits and help low-income families weather the recession.

NTFB’s Jan Pruitt is acting vigorously to alleviate the SNAP cuts’ effect. “We are trying to get ahead of this curve, and with the SNAP cuts adding to the line at a time when we’re struggling to get ahead of the curve, it’s just nearly impossible,” Pruitt said.

Jan Pruitt’s biggest concern is providing enough for the increased demand. It’s projected that SNAP cuts will affect 463,000 people in the food bank’s 13-county area, the majority of which are children, seniors and disabled North Texans. And it’s likely to get worse as Congress wrangles over how much to cut SNAP in the new Farm Bill.

Despite the increased plight of hunger as a result of SNAP cuts, the good news is this – you can help your fellow North Texans who are hungry today!

Donate by clicking above to make a difference for hungry North Texans

Donate by clicking above to make a difference for hungry North Texans

North Texas Food Bank is working diligently to see to it that no North Texans go hungry this year, but we desperately need your help. If you find hunger as unacceptable as our passionate staff and the other members of Feeding America do, all you have to do to help is volunteer your time, donate food, or simply donate your financial resources. Just ONE DOLLAR feeds THREE people!

Back to all posts.

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