February 21, 2020
by Cody Meyers

Southwest Regional Food Bank conference: An Education in Fighting Hunger

February 21, 2020
by Cody Meyers
Members of the NTFB External Affairs team at the Southwest Regional Food Bank conference. L-R: Marcus Baker, Valerie Hawthorne, Zahra Perez, Danielle Pestel and Cody Meyers.

An Education in Fighting Hunger

By Cody Meyers, NTFB Major Gift Officer

I have always been a big fan of conferences. Ever since my first church camp experience to now, 20 something years later, I absolutely love a good conference. I love the energy of being surrounded by like-minded people, learning and sharing best practices and meeting new people who share the same victories and struggles. Everything I love about a good conference – our friends at the Houston Food Bank (HFB) delivered at the Southwest Regional Food Bank conference held just a few weeks ago. Included below are my personal takeaways – and as a new Food Bank employee, I know these findings will help shape my work and outlook moving forward. I recently joined the NTFB External Affairs team and serve as a Major Gift Officer.

Hunger is a REAL problem

When we first arrived at the conference, our team was offered a tour of the Houston Food Bank. A classic move in the industry to help show the scale and scope of the work. Admittedly, before I began working at the North Texas Food Bank, my understanding of the work that happened at a food bank were unclear, and only involved what I assumed was a giant canned food drive with a handful of volunteers looking for expired Chef Boyardee cans. Now I know about the enormous scope of logistical and social work that these entities undertake, and the HFB was no exception. The Houston Food Bank is the largest food bank in the United States, currently resides in an old Sysco Foods manufacturing facility in East Houston and serves 18 counties with more than 1.1 million people who are identified as food-insecure. Just like my first tour at the North Texas Food Bank, I was blown away by the sheer size of the building, yet also perplexed by rooms filled with automated assembly lines. Then a familiar feeling hit me – the overwhelming and sobering thought that all of this is even necessary. HFB is one of 21 food banks in Texas, and is eagerly trying to eradicate food insecurity. Just like the North Texas Food Bank, our friends in Houston rely on corporate partners, government aid and community support to serve all our hungry neighbors around the state. Hunger is a real problem faced by too many. After our tour, my fire was lit even brighter to learn my role in how to end it.

We are all in this TOGETHER

Since joining the NTFB team, one thing has become clear – my understanding of the world is very limited. The factors that contribute to food insecurity, and the tough choices our hungry neighbors must make are all so complex that at times, it is difficult to comprehend if there will ever be a future without hunger. From farm bills to SNAP benefits paperwork, to canned food drives and supply chain logistics, there is an infinite amount of information to learn and comprehend before tackling the real issue of hunger. But here’s what I know – I have found great comfort in realizing that we are not alone in trying to solve it. The conference hosted more than 75 hunger fighters from food banks all over the Southwest region. We were given time away from breakouts and plenary sessions to talk to our counterparts from around the state, and the wealth of knowledge held by other veteran Food Bank fundraisers was welcomed. We spent the better part of two hours talking about retention strategies, corporate opportunities and big asks. I look forward to sharing a handful of reports that highlight key insights around us finding the right partners to ensure we close the hunger gap in North Texas.

We must be AUTHENTIC in our approach

Our final keynote session before we made the trek back to Dallas stuck with me. Dr. Todd Dewett, a leadership and organizational behavior expert, spoke on the value on leading and working with authenticity. With sleeves of tattoos on both arms, Dr. Dewett was unapologetically himself, and shared the value of not losing yourself to you work. How can we do that as food bankers? How do we authentically tell our personal story, and the story of those we serve, to build relationships? With each thought another question would follow, and eventually I had my A-HA conference moment. The need to solve the hunger crisis is real and ever present, and yes I know that we are all in this together, it really will take all of us to come to the table as our authentic selves to find an answer. The communities we serve across the state are diverse. The face of hunger looks like you, like me, like a childhood friend, or a stranger – why then wouldn’t those who work to close the gap be just as diverse as those we serve? Our hungry neighbors need, and more importantly, deserve the authentic version of myself and all of us at work. As with all teams, we must sharpen each other and learn from those around us. There are parts of me as a person and as a fundraiser that are unique, and to best serve our neighbors in need, I should embrace those parts rather than try to fit into the typical fundraiser box.

I want to give a huge shout out to the Houston Food Bank for a fantastic conference. I know I speak for all of us at the North Texas Food Bank when I say we learned so much, and are looking forward to the progress we will make with all of the information we gained over the past two days. As I enter month two at NTFB, I know I am leaving the conference even more eager to work toward closing the hunger gap in North Texas.

To learn how you can join me in this important work, visit www.ntfb.org.

Gratefully – Cody


Cody Meyers, Major Gift Officer

Cody Meyers joined the North Texas Food Bank in January of 2020. Prior to the Food Bank, Cody worked in Alumni Relations at The University of Texas at Dallas. He is passionate about closing the hunger gap in North Texas, customer journey mapping and organizational behavior. Outside of work, Cody enjoys working out at CrossFit Addison and a good weekend Netflix binge.

Members of the NTFB External Affairs team at the Southwest Regional Food Bank conference. L-R: Marcus Baker, Valerie Hawthorne, Zahra Perez, Danielle Pestel and Cody Meyers.

An Education in Fighting Hunger

By Cody Meyers, NTFB Major Gift Officer

I have always been a big fan of conferences. Ever since my first church camp experience to now, 20 something years later, I absolutely love a good conference. I love the energy of being surrounded by like-minded people, learning and sharing best practices and meeting new people who share the same victories and struggles. Everything I love about a good conference – our friends at the Houston Food Bank (HFB) delivered at the Southwest Regional Food Bank conference held just a few weeks ago. Included below are my personal takeaways – and as a new Food Bank employee, I know these findings will help shape my work and outlook moving forward. I recently joined the NTFB External Affairs team and serve as a Major Gift Officer.

Hunger is a REAL problem

When we first arrived at the conference, our team was offered a tour of the Houston Food Bank. A classic move in the industry to help show the scale and scope of the work. Admittedly, before I began working at the North Texas Food Bank, my understanding of the work that happened at a food bank were unclear, and only involved what I assumed was a giant canned food drive with a handful of volunteers looking for expired Chef Boyardee cans. Now I know about the enormous scope of logistical and social work that these entities undertake, and the HFB was no exception. The Houston Food Bank is the largest food bank in the United States, currently resides in an old Sysco Foods manufacturing facility in East Houston and serves 18 counties with more than 1.1 million people who are identified as food-insecure. Just like my first tour at the North Texas Food Bank, I was blown away by the sheer size of the building, yet also perplexed by rooms filled with automated assembly lines. Then a familiar feeling hit me – the overwhelming and sobering thought that all of this is even necessary. HFB is one of 21 food banks in Texas, and is eagerly trying to eradicate food insecurity. Just like the North Texas Food Bank, our friends in Houston rely on corporate partners, government aid and community support to serve all our hungry neighbors around the state. Hunger is a real problem faced by too many. After our tour, my fire was lit even brighter to learn my role in how to end it.

We are all in this TOGETHER

Since joining the NTFB team, one thing has become clear – my understanding of the world is very limited. The factors that contribute to food insecurity, and the tough choices our hungry neighbors must make are all so complex that at times, it is difficult to comprehend if there will ever be a future without hunger. From farm bills to SNAP benefits paperwork, to canned food drives and supply chain logistics, there is an infinite amount of information to learn and comprehend before tackling the real issue of hunger. But here’s what I know – I have found great comfort in realizing that we are not alone in trying to solve it. The conference hosted more than 75 hunger fighters from food banks all over the Southwest region. We were given time away from breakouts and plenary sessions to talk to our counterparts from around the state, and the wealth of knowledge held by other veteran Food Bank fundraisers was welcomed. We spent the better part of two hours talking about retention strategies, corporate opportunities and big asks. I look forward to sharing a handful of reports that highlight key insights around us finding the right partners to ensure we close the hunger gap in North Texas.

We must be AUTHENTIC in our approach

Our final keynote session before we made the trek back to Dallas stuck with me. Dr. Todd Dewett, a leadership and organizational behavior expert, spoke on the value on leading and working with authenticity. With sleeves of tattoos on both arms, Dr. Dewett was unapologetically himself, and shared the value of not losing yourself to you work. How can we do that as food bankers? How do we authentically tell our personal story, and the story of those we serve, to build relationships? With each thought another question would follow, and eventually I had my A-HA conference moment. The need to solve the hunger crisis is real and ever present, and yes I know that we are all in this together, it really will take all of us to come to the table as our authentic selves to find an answer. The communities we serve across the state are diverse. The face of hunger looks like you, like me, like a childhood friend, or a stranger – why then wouldn’t those who work to close the gap be just as diverse as those we serve? Our hungry neighbors need, and more importantly, deserve the authentic version of myself and all of us at work. As with all teams, we must sharpen each other and learn from those around us. There are parts of me as a person and as a fundraiser that are unique, and to best serve our neighbors in need, I should embrace those parts rather than try to fit into the typical fundraiser box.

I want to give a huge shout out to the Houston Food Bank for a fantastic conference. I know I speak for all of us at the North Texas Food Bank when I say we learned so much, and are looking forward to the progress we will make with all of the information we gained over the past two days. As I enter month two at NTFB, I know I am leaving the conference even more eager to work toward closing the hunger gap in North Texas.

To learn how you can join me in this important work, visit www.ntfb.org.

Gratefully – Cody


Cody Meyers, Major Gift Officer

Cody Meyers joined the North Texas Food Bank in January of 2020. Prior to the Food Bank, Cody worked in Alumni Relations at The University of Texas at Dallas. He is passionate about closing the hunger gap in North Texas, customer journey mapping and organizational behavior. Outside of work, Cody enjoys working out at CrossFit Addison and a good weekend Netflix binge.


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January 15, 2020
by Trisha Cunningham

FY20: The Year of Community

January 15, 2020
by Trisha Cunningham

While most celebrated the New Year just a few days ago, at the North Texas Food Bank, we welcomed our new (fiscal) year on July 1. With the start of each new fiscal year, just as many make resolutions, at the Food Bank, our team selects an annual theme, words to guide our work and our focus during the months ahead. This year in FY20, we selected; The Year of Community.

Now let me clarify: our critical work at the Food Bank has always been focused on our community. Serving our hungry neighbors in need, has, and forever will be, at the center of all that we do. Add to that our valued partnerships and collaborations with volunteers, civic partners, corporations and many others, and it’s easy to see that our organization rests firmly on the foundation of engaging, serving and strengthening our community.

As we considered the current environment in North Texas – we set two primary goals with our theme: provide more meals than ever before, while raising more funds than ever before, all to advance our efforts in closing the hunger gap in our community. We know that far too many in our community face hunger day in and day out. We also know that our community is comprised of neighbors and organizations who are determined to stop this heartbreaking cycle of food insecurity. All this to say, at the North Texas Food Bank, this is our year to help more neighbors overcome hunger, with more help from neighbors who are committed to this important cause.

Next we set four key priorities: Foster Team Excellence, Engage the Community, Serve the Community and Strengthen our Infrastructure. Already in motion are several new initiatives and efforts to help propel us toward reaching our goals, and I am confident that together, we can provide our neighbors with more nutritious food this year.

This is our Year of Community, but really it is The Year of Brianna, a single mom of four who recently brought a homeless neighbor with her to a local food pantry within our Feeding Network. This is The Year of Glenn, a neighbor who volunteers at the same Partner Agency where he receives food assistance. The Year of Dan, a NTFB warehouse volunteer who shared with our staff that his mother once depended on food from our senior programs.

And I hope this can be your year – The Year of You, our North Texas neighbor who joins us in our commitment to end hunger. Because when our community stands together against hunger, I know we will provide more nutritious meals than ever before.

To learn how you can help fight hunger in our community, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.

With Gratitude,

Trisha

President and CEO, North Texas Food Bank


Trisha Cunningham, President and CEO

Trisha Cunningham is President and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB), a $130 million nonprofit leading the fight against hunger in North Texas. Trisha and her team of 170 employees and 41,000 volunteers work with more than 200 partner agencies from the NTFB Feeding Network to provide access to almost 77 million meals annually across a diverse 13-county service area. For more than 30 years, Trisha has served her community in various capacities, most recently as Chief Citizenship Officer at Texas Instruments (TI). Her commitment to nourishing her neighbors is evident in her vast civic involvement, and when she is not volunteering her time in the community, she can be found spending time with her family.

While most celebrated the New Year just a few days ago, at the North Texas Food Bank, we welcomed our new (fiscal) year on July 1. With the start of each new fiscal year, just as many make resolutions, at the Food Bank, our team selects an annual theme, words to guide our work and our focus during the months ahead. This year in FY20, we selected; The Year of Community.

Now let me clarify: our critical work at the Food Bank has always been focused on our community. Serving our hungry neighbors in need, has, and forever will be, at the center of all that we do. Add to that our valued partnerships and collaborations with volunteers, civic partners, corporations and many others, and it’s easy to see that our organization rests firmly on the foundation of engaging, serving and strengthening our community.

As we considered the current environment in North Texas – we set two primary goals with our theme: provide more meals than ever before, while raising more funds than ever before, all to advance our efforts in closing the hunger gap in our community. We know that far too many in our community face hunger day in and day out. We also know that our community is comprised of neighbors and organizations who are determined to stop this heartbreaking cycle of food insecurity. All this to say, at the North Texas Food Bank, this is our year to help more neighbors overcome hunger, with more help from neighbors who are committed to this important cause.

Next we set four key priorities: Foster Team Excellence, Engage the Community, Serve the Community and Strengthen our Infrastructure. Already in motion are several new initiatives and efforts to help propel us toward reaching our goals, and I am confident that together, we can provide our neighbors with more nutritious food this year.

This is our Year of Community, but really it is The Year of Brianna, a single mom of four who recently brought a homeless neighbor with her to a local food pantry within our Feeding Network. This is The Year of Glenn, a neighbor who volunteers at the same Partner Agency where he receives food assistance. The Year of Dan, a NTFB warehouse volunteer who shared with our staff that his mother once depended on food from our senior programs.

And I hope this can be your year – The Year of You, our North Texas neighbor who joins us in our commitment to end hunger. Because when our community stands together against hunger, I know we will provide more nutritious meals than ever before.

To learn how you can help fight hunger in our community, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.

With Gratitude,

Trisha

President and CEO, North Texas Food Bank


Trisha Cunningham, President and CEO

Trisha Cunningham is President and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB), a $130 million nonprofit leading the fight against hunger in North Texas. Trisha and her team of 170 employees and 41,000 volunteers work with more than 200 partner agencies from the NTFB Feeding Network to provide access to almost 77 million meals annually across a diverse 13-county service area. For more than 30 years, Trisha has served her community in various capacities, most recently as Chief Citizenship Officer at Texas Instruments (TI). Her commitment to nourishing her neighbors is evident in her vast civic involvement, and when she is not volunteering her time in the community, she can be found spending time with her family.


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January 08, 2020
by Erica Yaeger

A Recipe to Fill More Bowls

January 08, 2020
by Erica Yaeger

An empty bowl. So many of our North Texas neighbors find their bowls, and their stomachs, void of nourishing food on a regular basis. Way too many of them. More than 800,000 North Texans are food insecure, with one in five of them children.

The North Texas Food Bank’s 21st Annual Empty Bowls event, sponsored by Kroger, will be held Thursday, February 27 from 6 – 9 p.m. at the Perot Family Campus in Plano. Each guest will receive a handcrafted bowl from a local artisan to serve as a reminder that not everyone’s bowl is full for our neighbors facing hunger. They will also enjoy bowl friendly fare prepared by talented chefs and restaurants. This special gathering suppports our ability to provide critical food to our hungry neighbors, filling more empty plates and bowls throughout our community.

So many of my favorite foods are served up in bowls…from cereal to hearty soups and stews to ice-cream. I recognize how lucky I am to always have access to healthy, and sometimes not so healthy, food. Recently I uncovered my granny’s recipe box, which included a recipe for her Winter Day Bean Soup. The smells and the memories soon consumed my kitchen, and the beautiful bowl from last year’s event was soon filled with this flavorful, simple meal. 

This bowl of beans brought back another vivid memory. Granny was the one who first took me to volunteer at the local food pantry, the Fort Mill Care Center, when I was in high school. She was a loyal volunteer and spent many days assisting her food-insecure neighbors. It warmed my heart to know I was continuing her work and enjoying her recipe out of my North Texas Food Bank bowl.


Granny’s Winter Day Bean Soup

  • 2 cups dried beans
  • 2 cups ham our sausage
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 t chili powder
  • 1 28 oz can tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 T lemon juice

Rinse beans, place in large pot and cover with water. Add salt and soak overnight. Drain and add 2 qts water and ham or sausage and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for three hours. Add onion, garlic, chili powder, tomatoes and lemon juice. Simmer another hour.  Add salt and pepper as needed.


What are your favorite recipes to fill your bowl? I’d love to know – please include them in the comments section below.

I hope you will join me at Empty Bowls on February 27, and taste a few of our community’s favorite recipes while helping fill more bowls for our neighbors in need.

To learn more about Empty Bowls, or to purchase tickets, visit ntfb.org/emptybowls.


Erica Yaeger, Chief External Affairs Officer

Erica Yaeger oversees the External Affairs Department of the Food Bank which encompasses  the fundraisers, marketing and communications, the volunteer team, our advocacy efforts and the Gift and Development Services team. Prior to joining the Food Bank, Erica worked in development at The University of Texas at Dallas. She is passionate about writing, storytelling and ensuring that our neighbors have the resources they need. Her happy place is on the lake with her two kids and husband Dave.

An empty bowl. So many of our North Texas neighbors find their bowls, and their stomachs, void of nourishing food on a regular basis. Way too many of them. More than 800,000 North Texans are food insecure, with one in five of them children.

The North Texas Food Bank’s 21st Annual Empty Bowls event, sponsored by Kroger, will be held Thursday, February 27 from 6 – 9 p.m. at the Perot Family Campus in Plano. Each guest will receive a handcrafted bowl from a local artisan to serve as a reminder that not everyone’s bowl is full for our neighbors facing hunger. They will also enjoy bowl friendly fare prepared by talented chefs and restaurants. This special gathering suppports our ability to provide critical food to our hungry neighbors, filling more empty plates and bowls throughout our community.

So many of my favorite foods are served up in bowls…from cereal to hearty soups and stews to ice-cream. I recognize how lucky I am to always have access to healthy, and sometimes not so healthy, food. Recently I uncovered my granny’s recipe box, which included a recipe for her Winter Day Bean Soup. The smells and the memories soon consumed my kitchen, and the beautiful bowl from last year’s event was soon filled with this flavorful, simple meal. 

This bowl of beans brought back another vivid memory. Granny was the one who first took me to volunteer at the local food pantry, the Fort Mill Care Center, when I was in high school. She was a loyal volunteer and spent many days assisting her food-insecure neighbors. It warmed my heart to know I was continuing her work and enjoying her recipe out of my North Texas Food Bank bowl.


Granny’s Winter Day Bean Soup

  • 2 cups dried beans
  • 2 cups ham our sausage
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 t chili powder
  • 1 28 oz can tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 T lemon juice

Rinse beans, place in large pot and cover with water. Add salt and soak overnight. Drain and add 2 qts water and ham or sausage and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for three hours. Add onion, garlic, chili powder, tomatoes and lemon juice. Simmer another hour.  Add salt and pepper as needed.


What are your favorite recipes to fill your bowl? I’d love to know – please include them in the comments section below.

I hope you will join me at Empty Bowls on February 27, and taste a few of our community’s favorite recipes while helping fill more bowls for our neighbors in need.

To learn more about Empty Bowls, or to purchase tickets, visit ntfb.org/emptybowls.


Erica Yaeger, Chief External Affairs Officer

Erica Yaeger oversees the External Affairs Department of the Food Bank which encompasses  the fundraisers, marketing and communications, the volunteer team, our advocacy efforts and the Gift and Development Services team. Prior to joining the Food Bank, Erica worked in development at The University of Texas at Dallas. She is passionate about writing, storytelling and ensuring that our neighbors have the resources they need. Her happy place is on the lake with her two kids and husband Dave.


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December 19, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Hunger During the Holidays

December 19, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Last year, Ralph received food for a holiday meal from a food pantry within the Food Bank’s Feeding Network of Partner Agencies.

No one wants to spend Christmas night, or any night, with an empty stomach. Today in North Texas, the likelihood of that happening is almost certain. With 800,000 neighbors in our community living in food-insecure households, meaning they don’t know where or when they will find their next meal – this holiday season likely finds far too many hungry.

The juxtaposition of opposing realities in our community hits harder this time of year. While many spend this season searching for the perfect present, others are searching for critical nourishment. As some prepare for holiday meals with family and friends, others long for a day when their pantry will hold healthy foods.

The truth is – hunger happens every day, and exists in every zip code, even where you might least expect. Just down the street, at your nearby school, or even in your office – you are surrounded by neighbors facing hunger. Neighbors like Ralph, a single father of five caring for his aging parents and younger brother with special needs. He does his best to make ends meet, but his budget is stretched-thin, especially during the holiday season. But last Christmas, your generosity provided a healthy, holiday meal for Ralph and his family.

“We got almost everything that we had for Christmas dinner from the pantry because I couldn’t afford the groceries, said Ralph. “They have really been here for us.”

This holiday season, please remember that for many neighbors, this time of year does not bring presents or festive meals. For them, it is likely a time when the gravity of their situation, their critical fight against hunger, seems even further from the reality that most experience – but we can change that.

Together, we can take a stand against hunger, and bridge this gap in our community. We can provide our neighbors in need with nutritious foods, and help create a reality where finding that next meal is no longer a daily struggle, even on Christmas night. To join the North Texas Food Bank in our work closing the hunger gap in North Texas, visit www.ntfb.org.

Last year, Ralph received food for a holiday meal from a food pantry within the Food Bank’s Feeding Network of Partner Agencies.

No one wants to spend Christmas night, or any night, with an empty stomach. Today in North Texas, the likelihood of that happening is almost certain. With 800,000 neighbors in our community living in food-insecure households, meaning they don’t know where or when they will find their next meal – this holiday season likely finds far too many hungry.

The juxtaposition of opposing realities in our community hits harder this time of year. While many spend this season searching for the perfect present, others are searching for critical nourishment. As some prepare for holiday meals with family and friends, others long for a day when their pantry will hold healthy foods.

The truth is – hunger happens every day, and exists in every zip code, even where you might least expect. Just down the street, at your nearby school, or even in your office – you are surrounded by neighbors facing hunger. Neighbors like Ralph, a single father of five caring for his aging parents and younger brother with special needs. He does his best to make ends meet, but his budget is stretched-thin, especially during the holiday season. But last Christmas, your generosity provided a healthy, holiday meal for Ralph and his family.

“We got almost everything that we had for Christmas dinner from the pantry because I couldn’t afford the groceries, said Ralph. “They have really been here for us.”

This holiday season, please remember that for many neighbors, this time of year does not bring presents or festive meals. For them, it is likely a time when the gravity of their situation, their critical fight against hunger, seems even further from the reality that most experience – but we can change that.

Together, we can take a stand against hunger, and bridge this gap in our community. We can provide our neighbors in need with nutritious foods, and help create a reality where finding that next meal is no longer a daily struggle, even on Christmas night. To join the North Texas Food Bank in our work closing the hunger gap in North Texas, visit www.ntfb.org.


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December 03, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Join NTFB on #GivingTuesday

December 03, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Scarlet and her mother Ruth receive food assistance from the NTFB Mobile Pantry program.

Today is #GivingTuesday, a day that celebrates generosity and the power of people and organizations to transform their communities and world.

At the North Texas Food Bank, we believe that nourished people can create communities that flourish and thrive, and for whole communities to thrive, each neighbor needs to be nourished in many ways. An absolutely critical component of that belief is the acknowledgement that fundamental nourishment comes from nutritious food.

Neighbors like Ruth and her daughter Scarlet need our help to flourish and thrive. Ruth works at a local healthcare clinic that provides free of cost care to underserved neighbors. While her work helps others in need, she and her family often worry about keeping food on their table. The expenses that come with a growing family can create a financial burden for just about anyone. “We always, as a parent, we want to be there for our children all the time,” she shares.

But Ruth receives fresh produce, protein and shelf-stable items from a NTFB Mobile Pantry truck. Her children look forward to the fresh fruit. “They like the bananas and grapes,” she shares. Even as Ruth struggles with hunger, she works to help others struggling in our community. Imagine what might be possible if Ruth and her family overcame hunger. How many more neighbors in our community are like Ruth?

When you support the North Texas Food Bank on #GivingTuesday, your gift will have twice the impact for neighbors like Ruth and her family. Through midnight tonight, Santander Consumer USA Foundation is matching every gift made up to $100,000. That’s two times the nutritious meals for hungry children, seniors and families in North Texas.

Join us today, and make a gift in honor of someone this holiday season, because the gift of nourishment will transform our community. To make a #GivingTuesday gift, visit ntfb.org/givingtuesday or visit the Food Bank Facebook page.

Scarlet and her mother Ruth receive food assistance from the NTFB Mobile Pantry program.

Today is #GivingTuesday, a day that celebrates generosity and the power of people and organizations to transform their communities and world.

At the North Texas Food Bank, we believe that nourished people can create communities that flourish and thrive, and for whole communities to thrive, each neighbor needs to be nourished in many ways. An absolutely critical component of that belief is the acknowledgement that fundamental nourishment comes from nutritious food.

Neighbors like Ruth and her daughter Scarlet need our help to flourish and thrive. Ruth works at a local healthcare clinic that provides free of cost care to underserved neighbors. While her work helps others in need, she and her family often worry about keeping food on their table. The expenses that come with a growing family can create a financial burden for just about anyone. “We always, as a parent, we want to be there for our children all the time,” she shares.

But Ruth receives fresh produce, protein and shelf-stable items from a NTFB Mobile Pantry truck. Her children look forward to the fresh fruit. “They like the bananas and grapes,” she shares. Even as Ruth struggles with hunger, she works to help others struggling in our community. Imagine what might be possible if Ruth and her family overcame hunger. How many more neighbors in our community are like Ruth?

When you support the North Texas Food Bank on #GivingTuesday, your gift will have twice the impact for neighbors like Ruth and her family. Through midnight tonight, Santander Consumer USA Foundation is matching every gift made up to $100,000. That’s two times the nutritious meals for hungry children, seniors and families in North Texas.

Join us today, and make a gift in honor of someone this holiday season, because the gift of nourishment will transform our community. To make a #GivingTuesday gift, visit ntfb.org/givingtuesday or visit the Food Bank Facebook page.


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November 25, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Thank You from NTFB

November 25, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Petra stands beside her groceries from a local West Dallas food pantry. Thanks to the pantry, she received a turkey she’ll cook on Thanksgiving.

During this season of gratitude, at the North Texas Food Bank, we are immeasurably thankful for your support feeding our hungry neighbors. How can we express our appreciation?

“You can’t tell them thank you,” explains Petra. “Because thank you is not enough.”

Petra receives food assistance from a local pantry in her West Dallas neighborhood. With a family of seven all under one roof, they often struggle to keep food on the table. Recently they had to choose between food, and having electricity. For neighbors in need, food is often the first expense cut when faced with adversity.

So Petra is right. Thank you does not seem adequate when expressing our sincere appreciation for your support providing healthy food to hungry children, seniors and families. Your commitment ensures that every day, our NTFB team and vast Feeding Network of more than 200 Partner Agencies supplies access to 200,000 nutritious meals. Each meal nourishing a hungry neighbor, providing hope for a better tomorrow.

When thank you seems small, like Petra — we will act out our appreciation. Even with what little she has, she supports her neighbors in need, and has taught her three young children to do the same.

“My door is always open. I don’t care who you are. I have a meal for you,” she says. “That’s why I’m grateful for the pantry, because it helps us.”

To express our appreciation during this Thanksgiving season, and all throughout the year, we will continue onward. We will strive toward our goal of ending hunger by providing more healthy meals to the almost 800,000 food-insecure neighbors in North Texas. With each meal provided, we honor your support by nourishing a neighbor in need. And with that, we thank you.

To learn how you can help end hunger in North Texas, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.

Petra stands beside her groceries from a local West Dallas food pantry. Thanks to the pantry, she received a turkey she’ll cook on Thanksgiving.

During this season of gratitude, at the North Texas Food Bank, we are immeasurably thankful for your support feeding our hungry neighbors. How can we express our appreciation?

“You can’t tell them thank you,” explains Petra. “Because thank you is not enough.”

Petra receives food assistance from a local pantry in her West Dallas neighborhood. With a family of seven all under one roof, they often struggle to keep food on the table. Recently they had to choose between food, and having electricity. For neighbors in need, food is often the first expense cut when faced with adversity.

So Petra is right. Thank you does not seem adequate when expressing our sincere appreciation for your support providing healthy food to hungry children, seniors and families. Your commitment ensures that every day, our NTFB team and vast Feeding Network of more than 200 Partner Agencies supplies access to 200,000 nutritious meals. Each meal nourishing a hungry neighbor, providing hope for a better tomorrow.

When thank you seems small, like Petra — we will act out our appreciation. Even with what little she has, she supports her neighbors in need, and has taught her three young children to do the same.

“My door is always open. I don’t care who you are. I have a meal for you,” she says. “That’s why I’m grateful for the pantry, because it helps us.”

To express our appreciation during this Thanksgiving season, and all throughout the year, we will continue onward. We will strive toward our goal of ending hunger by providing more healthy meals to the almost 800,000 food-insecure neighbors in North Texas. With each meal provided, we honor your support by nourishing a neighbor in need. And with that, we thank you.

To learn how you can help end hunger in North Texas, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.


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November 20, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Join Ebenezer Scrooge and Support NTFB this Holiday Season

November 20, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Patrick Bilbow (L) and Brandon Potter (R) star in Dallas Theater Center’s A Christmas Carol; photo by Kim Leeson.

This holiday season, make plans to see the Dallas Theater Center’s annual production of A Christmas Carol, and help provide hope for hungry North Texas neighbors. The North Texas Food Bank is proud to once again partner with the Dallas Theater Center for the 12th annual collection drive in conjunction with this hit holiday performance. Throughout the production, starting Friday, November 22 through Sunday, December 29, DTC will collect canned goods in the theater’s lobby, and following each performance, cast members will also collect monetary donations.

While this initiative might seem like just a collection of unwanted pantry items, or spare change – it could not be further from that. Since 2007, the Dallas Theater Center has donated more than $750,000 to the Food Bank, equivalent to 2.25 million meals, to help provide nutritious meals for North Texans in need. The combined monetary and canned food donations helps the Food Bank meet the increased need for food assistance during the holidays when the demand often increases.

This year, thanks to a generous matching donation opportunity from Sammons Enterprises and the Beaumont Foundation of America, all gifts made now through December 31, will be doubled, up to $200,000. This mean that every $1 donated will provide six meals to hunger neighbors across a diverse 13-county service area. Even a small contribution goes a long way.

To learn how you can help hungry neighbors in need this holiday season, and all throughout the year, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.

To purchase tickets to A Christmas Carol, playing at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre, visit www.DallasTheaterCenter.org or call (214) 522-8499.

Patrick Bilbow (L) and Brandon Potter (R) star in Dallas Theater Center’s A Christmas Carol; photo by Kim Leeson.

This holiday season, make plans to see the Dallas Theater Center’s annual production of A Christmas Carol, and help provide hope for hungry North Texas neighbors. The North Texas Food Bank is proud to once again partner with the Dallas Theater Center for the 12th annual collection drive in conjunction with this hit holiday performance. Throughout the production, starting Friday, November 22 through Sunday, December 29, DTC will collect canned goods in the theater’s lobby, and following each performance, cast members will also collect monetary donations.

While this initiative might seem like just a collection of unwanted pantry items, or spare change – it could not be further from that. Since 2007, the Dallas Theater Center has donated more than $750,000 to the Food Bank, equivalent to 2.25 million meals, to help provide nutritious meals for North Texans in need. The combined monetary and canned food donations helps the Food Bank meet the increased need for food assistance during the holidays when the demand often increases.

This year, thanks to a generous matching donation opportunity from Sammons Enterprises and the Beaumont Foundation of America, all gifts made now through December 31, will be doubled, up to $200,000. This mean that every $1 donated will provide six meals to hunger neighbors across a diverse 13-county service area. Even a small contribution goes a long way.

To learn how you can help hungry neighbors in need this holiday season, and all throughout the year, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.

To purchase tickets to A Christmas Carol, playing at the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre, visit www.DallasTheaterCenter.org or call (214) 522-8499.


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November 14, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Meet Debra

November 14, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Not too long ago, Debra lived on the streets, and survived meal-to-meal. She now receives food assistance from a local food pantry within the Food Bank’s network of Partner Agencies.

“Homeless and starving.”

Debra didn’t hesitate when asked what prompted her visit to the Marillac Food Pantry operated by NTFB Partner Agency Catholic Charities Dallas. Located just a few miles from Interstate 30 in West Dallas and nestled within the Brady Senior Services Center. Last year, this pantry distributed more than 260,000 pounds of food and served 1,300 families. Many like Debra.

Thanks to a friend who offered her a ride, this is Debra’s first visit. When her disability status changed unexpectedly, Debra struggled to make ends meet. Soon she found herself hungry and homeless.

“I would hang out near gas stations,” said Debra. “Some days I would get lucky, and somebody would pass by, and buy me a hotdog or something.”

Debra now lives with her brother and his three young children. “He can’t afford to feed me, and his crew,” she explains, so their arrangement requires she supply her own food. She moved in just a few months ago, and “as long as I get my own food,” Debra says, “then I’m all right.”

While talking, lively music from down the hall can be heard. Senior neighbors gather here daily for meals, activities and services. Posted just outside the pantry is a flyer for flu shots. The squealing of a cart heavy with food suddenly overpowers the music. A pantry volunteer helps a client guide the cart outside. Today the pantry shelves display bags of fresh carrots, potatoes, peppers, radishes and grapes. Stored in refrigerators nearby are milk and meat. Cardboard boxes filled with food line the back wall. Inside are beans, bags of brown rice and other shelf-stable items.

What food is Debra looking forward to receiving today during her visit?

“Whatever they’ll give me,” she replies lightheartedly.

In North Texas, nearly 800,000 neighbors are food-insecure, and do not know where they will find their next meal. Many are homeless, though most are not. But most, like Debra, welcome whatever food they can receive. Every day, the North Texas Food Bank provides our hungry neighbors in need with healthy foods that they likely could not obtain otherwise. For Debra, this food not only provides critical nourishment, but ensures she stays off the streets.

To learn how you can help end hunger in North Texas, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.

Not too long ago, Debra lived on the streets, and survived meal-to-meal. She now receives food assistance from a local food pantry within the Food Bank’s network of Partner Agencies.

“Homeless and starving.”

Debra didn’t hesitate when asked what prompted her visit to the Marillac Food Pantry operated by NTFB Partner Agency Catholic Charities Dallas. Located just a few miles from Interstate 30 in West Dallas and nestled within the Brady Senior Services Center. Last year, this pantry distributed more than 260,000 pounds of food and served 1,300 families. Many like Debra.

Thanks to a friend who offered her a ride, this is Debra’s first visit. When her disability status changed unexpectedly, Debra struggled to make ends meet. Soon she found herself hungry and homeless.

“I would hang out near gas stations,” said Debra. “Some days I would get lucky, and somebody would pass by, and buy me a hotdog or something.”

Debra now lives with her brother and his three young children. “He can’t afford to feed me, and his crew,” she explains, so their arrangement requires she supply her own food. She moved in just a few months ago, and “as long as I get my own food,” Debra says, “then I’m all right.”

While talking, lively music from down the hall can be heard. Senior neighbors gather here daily for meals, activities and services. Posted just outside the pantry is a flyer for flu shots. The squealing of a cart heavy with food suddenly overpowers the music. A pantry volunteer helps a client guide the cart outside. Today the pantry shelves display bags of fresh carrots, potatoes, peppers, radishes and grapes. Stored in refrigerators nearby are milk and meat. Cardboard boxes filled with food line the back wall. Inside are beans, bags of brown rice and other shelf-stable items.

What food is Debra looking forward to receiving today during her visit?

“Whatever they’ll give me,” she replies lightheartedly.

In North Texas, nearly 800,000 neighbors are food-insecure, and do not know where they will find their next meal. Many are homeless, though most are not. But most, like Debra, welcome whatever food they can receive. Every day, the North Texas Food Bank provides our hungry neighbors in need with healthy foods that they likely could not obtain otherwise. For Debra, this food not only provides critical nourishment, but ensures she stays off the streets.

To learn how you can help end hunger in North Texas, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved.


Caroline Mandel, Writer

Caroline Mandel joined the North Texas Food Bank in fall 2018, and is passionate about sharing client stories – the face of hunger is changing and she is committed to raising awareness surrounding hidden hunger and hardship. Outside the office, she enjoys spending time with her two young sons and husband.


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November 07, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

The Face of Hunger

November 07, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

Do you know the face of hunger?

This holiday season, the North Texas Food Bank launched The Face of Hunger giving campaign to raise awareness regarding the many faces of hunger. With nearly 800,000 neighbors residing in food-insecure households, the face of hunger is all around. Maybe in the house down the street, at a nearby childcare center or school, possibly in the office across the hall – you likely know the face of hunger. In our community, individuals who don’t know where or how they will find their next meal could be a neighbor, colleague or classmate.

Hunger is not bound by race, color, creed, age or socio-economic level, and can affect anyone. For that reason, the campaign features images that reflect this diversity, emphasizing that hunger does not discriminate. The campaign runs through December 31, and aims to strengthen support during the holidays when the need for food assistance increases. Our neighbors in need don’t have to spend the holiday season, or any day of the year, facing hunger.

Thanks to a generous matching donation opportunity from Sammons Enterprises and the Beaumont Foundation of America, all gifts made during the campaign will be doubled, up to $200,000. That means $1 provides six meals. Your support provides hungry neighbors with fresh produce, proteins and shelf-stable items, and ensures they will find food on their tables during a season when most gather for special meals with friends and family.

During these last few months of 2019, take a moment and remember – the face of hunger is likely closer than you think, and when you see the face of hunger, you face hunger. This holiday season, and all throughout the year, join the Food Bank in facing and fighting hunger.

Visit FaceOfHunger.org to learn more.

Do you know the face of hunger?

This holiday season, the North Texas Food Bank launched The Face of Hunger giving campaign to raise awareness regarding the many faces of hunger. With nearly 800,000 neighbors residing in food-insecure households, the face of hunger is all around. Maybe in the house down the street, at a nearby childcare center or school, possibly in the office across the hall – you likely know the face of hunger. In our community, individuals who don’t know where or how they will find their next meal could be a neighbor, colleague or classmate.

Hunger is not bound by race, color, creed, age or socio-economic level, and can affect anyone. For that reason, the campaign features images that reflect this diversity, emphasizing that hunger does not discriminate. The campaign runs through December 31, and aims to strengthen support during the holidays when the need for food assistance increases. Our neighbors in need don’t have to spend the holiday season, or any day of the year, facing hunger.

Thanks to a generous matching donation opportunity from Sammons Enterprises and the Beaumont Foundation of America, all gifts made during the campaign will be doubled, up to $200,000. That means $1 provides six meals. Your support provides hungry neighbors with fresh produce, proteins and shelf-stable items, and ensures they will find food on their tables during a season when most gather for special meals with friends and family.

During these last few months of 2019, take a moment and remember – the face of hunger is likely closer than you think, and when you see the face of hunger, you face hunger. This holiday season, and all throughout the year, join the Food Bank in facing and fighting hunger.

Visit FaceOfHunger.org to learn more.


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October 29, 2019
by Caroline Mandel

NTFB Provides a Rapid Response for North Texas Neighbors Affected by Storms

October 29, 2019
by Caroline Mandel
Volunteers from Texas Instruments worked with Food Bank staff members to make door-to-door deliveries of relief packs and snack boxes to storm victims in the Hamilton Park neighborhood.

A week and a half has passed since nearly a dozen tornadoes ravaged North Texas, leaving a trail of debris and severely damaged homes and businesses. At the North Texas Food Bank, we extend our sincere condolences to our neighbors who have been impacted by this storm. As many begin the overwhelming process of shifting through the wreckage that was once home, the Food Bank is committed to extending food assistance to our neighbors in need. During the critical time following a major disaster, the Food Bank works collaboratively with fellow service-providers to ensure real-time assistance to our North Texas community.

For far too many in our community, the recent storm inflicted significant structural damage that prevented access to vehicles, and even with access, debris filled their streets, prohibiting travel. Thousands were without water or electricity, and with a power outage, and a pantry obliterated by high winds, finding food becomes a serious task. The Food Bank’s unique role during this time is to immediately provide food and beverages because our neighbors who have suffered greatly – should not also suffer from hunger. The Food Bank mobilized distributions of disaster relief packs and snack boxes to our network of partners who are on the front lines, working to help North Texans in need. In addition, the Food Bank’s fleet of mobile pantry trucks delivered assistance to several areas of need, with volunteers also making door-to-door distributions.

If you are interested in helping the Food Bank as we work to provide for our community, we strongly encourage you to consider donating on our website, or to host your own canned food drive to help collect non-perishable food. Thousands of our neighbors have suffered major damage to their homes and businesses, lost all perishable food and now face an unforeseen financial burden. To help the North Texas Food Bank help our neighbors in need, and empower our ability to provide a rapid response following any period of crisis, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved. The collective support from our community is more critical now than ever.

Volunteers from Texas Instruments worked with Food Bank staff members to make door-to-door deliveries of relief packs and snack boxes to storm victims in the Hamilton Park neighborhood.

A week and a half has passed since nearly a dozen tornadoes ravaged North Texas, leaving a trail of debris and severely damaged homes and businesses. At the North Texas Food Bank, we extend our sincere condolences to our neighbors who have been impacted by this storm. As many begin the overwhelming process of shifting through the wreckage that was once home, the Food Bank is committed to extending food assistance to our neighbors in need. During the critical time following a major disaster, the Food Bank works collaboratively with fellow service-providers to ensure real-time assistance to our North Texas community.

For far too many in our community, the recent storm inflicted significant structural damage that prevented access to vehicles, and even with access, debris filled their streets, prohibiting travel. Thousands were without water or electricity, and with a power outage, and a pantry obliterated by high winds, finding food becomes a serious task. The Food Bank’s unique role during this time is to immediately provide food and beverages because our neighbors who have suffered greatly – should not also suffer from hunger. The Food Bank mobilized distributions of disaster relief packs and snack boxes to our network of partners who are on the front lines, working to help North Texans in need. In addition, the Food Bank’s fleet of mobile pantry trucks delivered assistance to several areas of need, with volunteers also making door-to-door distributions.

If you are interested in helping the Food Bank as we work to provide for our community, we strongly encourage you to consider donating on our website, or to host your own canned food drive to help collect non-perishable food. Thousands of our neighbors have suffered major damage to their homes and businesses, lost all perishable food and now face an unforeseen financial burden. To help the North Texas Food Bank help our neighbors in need, and empower our ability to provide a rapid response following any period of crisis, visit www.ntfb.org/get-involved. The collective support from our community is more critical now than ever.


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