September 11, 2014
by Diana Carranza

Call Congress Today to Support TEFAP

September 11, 2014
by Diana Carranza

Call Congress 300x300 Call Congress Today to Support TEFAP

Feeding America has reached out to us with some late breaking news about TEFAP (The Emergency Food Assistance Program) that will require NTFB and our supporters to quickly mobilize.

Because Congress is running out of time before they recess until November to campaign, they will have to pass a Continuing Resolution (CR).  The proposed CR will likely fund the government at the previous year’s levels—before the farm bill was passed.  That means there is some ambiguity as to whether the additional TEFAP funding from the farm bill ($50 million for FY15) will be included in the CR.

We need to act quickly. TEFAP helps food banks provide nutritious food to low-income Americans in need of short-term hunger relief in partnership with local pantries, soup kitchens, and emergency shelters.  On average, TEFAP provides 20% of the food Feeding America distributes and serves as the foundation for much of what food banks distribute to clients.

Unfortunately, we have little time.  Please call both your senators and representative today, September 11.

Calling Congress is easy!  Here’s how:

  1. Call The Feeding America advocacy hotline at (888) 398-8702
  2. Listen to the pre-recorded message and enter your zip code when prompted.
  3. Once you are connected, state that you are a constituent and give your name and your hometown.  Be sure to give the name of the food bank or local agency you are affiliated with as well.
  4. Let them know you are calling about the Continuing Resolution and deliver this important message:

“I am calling in support of the North Texas Food Bank about a matter of critical importance to our food bank and community.  As you finalize the Continuing Resolution, please make sure the increase in TEFAP funding from the 2014 farm bill is included in the final bill.”

Be sure to dial back so you can speak with both of your senators and your representative.

As always, thanks for taking action against hunger in North Texas and beyond!

Call Congress 300x300 Call Congress Today to Support TEFAP

Feeding America has reached out to us with some late breaking news about TEFAP (The Emergency Food Assistance Program) that will require NTFB and our supporters to quickly mobilize.

Because Congress is running out of time before they recess until November to campaign, they will have to pass a Continuing Resolution (CR).  The proposed CR will likely fund the government at the previous year’s levels—before the farm bill was passed.  That means there is some ambiguity as to whether the additional TEFAP funding from the farm bill ($50 million for FY15) will be included in the CR.

We need to act quickly. TEFAP helps food banks provide nutritious food to low-income Americans in need of short-term hunger relief in partnership with local pantries, soup kitchens, and emergency shelters.  On average, TEFAP provides 20% of the food Feeding America distributes and serves as the foundation for much of what food banks distribute to clients.

Unfortunately, we have little time.  Please call both your senators and representative today, September 11.

Calling Congress is easy!  Here’s how:

  1. Call The Feeding America advocacy hotline at (888) 398-8702
  2. Listen to the pre-recorded message and enter your zip code when prompted.
  3. Once you are connected, state that you are a constituent and give your name and your hometown.  Be sure to give the name of the food bank or local agency you are affiliated with as well.
  4. Let them know you are calling about the Continuing Resolution and deliver this important message:

“I am calling in support of the North Texas Food Bank about a matter of critical importance to our food bank and community.  As you finalize the Continuing Resolution, please make sure the increase in TEFAP funding from the 2014 farm bill is included in the final bill.”

Be sure to dial back so you can speak with both of your senators and your representative.

As always, thanks for taking action against hunger in North Texas and beyond!


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September 02, 2014
by Kat Lindholm

You are what you eat: Why Food Insecurity is a Public Health Issue.

September 02, 2014
by Kat Lindholm

by Katherine Lindholm, RD, NTFB Nutrition Services Manager

You Are What You Eat Blog 1024x752 You are what you eat: Why Food Insecurity is a Public Health Issue. People need food and water to survive.  That’s a fairly straightforward fact.  The types and amount of food and drink consumed can impact ones health in a positive or negative way.  Still no protests?  I would venture to guess that most people agree with both statements.  The question becomes whether, when addressing food insecurity, should we consider the health repercussions of the food distributed to those in need?  I personally think that makes the most sense (but, as an RD, I’m certainly biased towards a health-based focus!).  Still, thinking objectively about the situation, why should we stop at helping people survive and instead, see how we can help them thrive?

The answer is: if we only focus on “filling tummies” and forget to consider what the long-term consequences are if that food doesn’t provide needed nutrients, we could be simply substituting one problem for another.  Fullness and malnourishment can and often do coexist.  Think about your car for a second: I’m not a car expert, but I know that filling my gas tank with orange juice instead of the required unleaded fuel would make a difference in how my car ran.  Yes, the tank would be full… but full of the wrong fuel.  I’m not saying that we should stop feeding people altogether, we should just ensure we are feeding them what their bodies need.  Providing no fuel doesn’t generate momentum in the right direction either.

Healthy, balanced diets can help reduce the risk for obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers (not to mention help in overall health and happiness!).  If we provide those needing food assistance with food that increases their risk for illnesses and disease, we may be decreasing their grocery budget and feeding them in the short-term, but drastically increasing their medical bills in the long-term.  We would be providing food, but hurting their health.

1 in 3 lbs fruit or veggie 300x300 You are what you eat: Why Food Insecurity is a Public Health Issue.

The great news is that health and hunger are no longer seen as completely separate issues (as they have often been in the past).  Feeding America started www.healthyfoodbankhub.org in 2013 as a place to share how food banks support health and to share nutrition-related resources among their partners.  In addition, last month Feeding America and HMS Holding Corp. also hosted a Virtual Town Hall on the issue. Locally, NTFB makes sure to offer an inventory full of all MyPlate food groups, focusing on nutrient-rich foods.  Over 1 in 3 pounds that NTFB distributes is a fruit or vegetable and 1 in 4 pounds is fresh produce. To top this off, free nutrition education is provided to low-income clients, helping support them in their journey towards a happy, healthy and hunger-free life!

There are certainly more challenges to address, policies to enact, collaborations to make, research to do and programs to pilot in order to fully eradicate food insecurity and associated, preventable health problems, but at least we’re pointed in the right direction.  Join us in pursuing a healthy and hunger-free community!

by Katherine Lindholm, RD, NTFB Nutrition Services Manager

You Are What You Eat Blog 1024x752 You are what you eat: Why Food Insecurity is a Public Health Issue. People need food and water to survive.  That’s a fairly straightforward fact.  The types and amount of food and drink consumed can impact ones health in a positive or negative way.  Still no protests?  I would venture to guess that most people agree with both statements.  The question becomes whether, when addressing food insecurity, should we consider the health repercussions of the food distributed to those in need?  I personally think that makes the most sense (but, as an RD, I’m certainly biased towards a health-based focus!).  Still, thinking objectively about the situation, why should we stop at helping people survive and instead, see how we can help them thrive?

The answer is: if we only focus on “filling tummies” and forget to consider what the long-term consequences are if that food doesn’t provide needed nutrients, we could be simply substituting one problem for another.  Fullness and malnourishment can and often do coexist.  Think about your car for a second: I’m not a car expert, but I know that filling my gas tank with orange juice instead of the required unleaded fuel would make a difference in how my car ran.  Yes, the tank would be full… but full of the wrong fuel.  I’m not saying that we should stop feeding people altogether, we should just ensure we are feeding them what their bodies need.  Providing no fuel doesn’t generate momentum in the right direction either.

Healthy, balanced diets can help reduce the risk for obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers (not to mention help in overall health and happiness!).  If we provide those needing food assistance with food that increases their risk for illnesses and disease, we may be decreasing their grocery budget and feeding them in the short-term, but drastically increasing their medical bills in the long-term.  We would be providing food, but hurting their health.

1 in 3 lbs fruit or veggie 300x300 You are what you eat: Why Food Insecurity is a Public Health Issue.

The great news is that health and hunger are no longer seen as completely separate issues (as they have often been in the past).  Feeding America started www.healthyfoodbankhub.org in 2013 as a place to share how food banks support health and to share nutrition-related resources among their partners.  In addition, last month Feeding America and HMS Holding Corp. also hosted a Virtual Town Hall on the issue. Locally, NTFB makes sure to offer an inventory full of all MyPlate food groups, focusing on nutrient-rich foods.  Over 1 in 3 pounds that NTFB distributes is a fruit or vegetable and 1 in 4 pounds is fresh produce. To top this off, free nutrition education is provided to low-income clients, helping support them in their journey towards a happy, healthy and hunger-free life!

There are certainly more challenges to address, policies to enact, collaborations to make, research to do and programs to pilot in order to fully eradicate food insecurity and associated, preventable health problems, but at least we’re pointed in the right direction.  Join us in pursuing a healthy and hunger-free community!


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August 25, 2014
by Jan Pruitt

In North Texas, the Face of Hunger May Surprise You…

August 25, 2014
by Jan Pruitt

The Face of Hunger may surprise you 1024x1024 In North Texas, the Face of Hunger May Surprise You...

by Jan Pruitt, President and CEO of NTFB

We’ve all felt hunger pangs – that growling from our stomach reminding us that it’s time to eat. If you don’t heed these warnings, you know you’ll likely get tired and it will be hard to focus. If you wait too long to eat, you become ravenous and can eat anything.  But when those pangs hit, many of us can reach into our refrigerators or pantries and find something to refuel our drained bodies.

What if the hunger pangs hit and you reached for food, but there was nothing there. Worse yet, what if your children felt this hunger, and looked to you to make it better, but you had nothing of real sustenance to feed them?

Perhaps you have been lucky enough to have never experienced food insecurity firsthand, but the unfortunate truth is that likely someone you know has worried about how to feed their family.

Hunger in America 2014, a new study released last week by Feeding America and the North Texas Food Bank, shows that every year more than 46 million Americans, including 12 million children and 7 million seniors, receive food assistance through the Feeding America network of food banks. In North Texas, more than 439,000 men, women and children turn to NTFB and its Partner Agencies for food assistance each year.

This number represents people like Arnold, a father of two young girls who found himself temporarily disabled after serious medical procedures. Without a steady income, he fed his family only through assistance from Seven Loaves Community, a NTFB Partner Agency in Plano. Or Roene, a senior who cares full time for her ailing husband and turns to Sharing Life Community Outreach in Mesquite to put food on the table.

HIA infographic final In North Texas, the Face of Hunger May Surprise You...

Contrary to some stereotypes, hunger is not a problem limited to the homeless and the uneducated. Ninety-five percent of clients we serve have permanent housing and 74 percent have a high school diploma or higher. Despite having an education and a roof over their heads, many families can’t make ends meet.

As President and CEO of NTFB and Board Chair for Feeding America, my work puts me on the front lines of the fight against hunger. I have seen the consequences of not having enough to eat.  Children are particularly vulnerable to these consequences, including adverse physical, behavioral and mental health effects due to insufficient nutrition. Through the study, we know we serve at least 125,000 children through our grocery/pantry programs; this doesn’t include the 11,000 children served through our Food 4 Kids program that provides backpacks with nutritious food for the weekend to chronically hungry children each Friday during the school year. As the new school year kicks off, we are reminded that the work we do to feed children is critical to the future of our community.

In addition, we’ve learned that many of the families we serve are facing health issues. Hunger in America 2014 found that 59 percent of households that use the NTFB network have a person with high blood pressure, and 33 percent report a member with diabetes. These conditions are only exacerbated by a lack of proper nutrition. Of the households who turn to NTFB’s network, 68 percent report having to choose between paying for food or paying for medical care.

Despite reports of declining unemployment rates and signs of a strengthening economy, NTFB and our agencies continue to see a persistent need.  Stagnant wages and underemployment play a role in this continuing struggle; the study finds that 73 percent of NTFB clients have incomes below the poverty level – for a family of four that means $23,850 or less.

These surprising new statistics are a wake-up call. We must work together to solve hunger in our community. We must work together so that families like Arnold’s and Roene’s have enough to eat. Take a stand against hunger. When you realize the true face of hunger in America and in North Texas, how can you remain silent?


Jan Pruitt is the President and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank and the Board Chair for Feeding America, a national hunger relief organization. Follow Jan on Twitter  and Facebook.

The Face of Hunger may surprise you 1024x1024 In North Texas, the Face of Hunger May Surprise You...

by Jan Pruitt, President and CEO of NTFB

We’ve all felt hunger pangs – that growling from our stomach reminding us that it’s time to eat. If you don’t heed these warnings, you know you’ll likely get tired and it will be hard to focus. If you wait too long to eat, you become ravenous and can eat anything.  But when those pangs hit, many of us can reach into our refrigerators or pantries and find something to refuel our drained bodies.

What if the hunger pangs hit and you reached for food, but there was nothing there. Worse yet, what if your children felt this hunger, and looked to you to make it better, but you had nothing of real sustenance to feed them?

Perhaps you have been lucky enough to have never experienced food insecurity firsthand, but the unfortunate truth is that likely someone you know has worried about how to feed their family.

Hunger in America 2014, a new study released last week by Feeding America and the North Texas Food Bank, shows that every year more than 46 million Americans, including 12 million children and 7 million seniors, receive food assistance through the Feeding America network of food banks. In North Texas, more than 439,000 men, women and children turn to NTFB and its Partner Agencies for food assistance each year.

This number represents people like Arnold, a father of two young girls who found himself temporarily disabled after serious medical procedures. Without a steady income, he fed his family only through assistance from Seven Loaves Community, a NTFB Partner Agency in Plano. Or Roene, a senior who cares full time for her ailing husband and turns to Sharing Life Community Outreach in Mesquite to put food on the table.

HIA infographic final In North Texas, the Face of Hunger May Surprise You...

Contrary to some stereotypes, hunger is not a problem limited to the homeless and the uneducated. Ninety-five percent of clients we serve have permanent housing and 74 percent have a high school diploma or higher. Despite having an education and a roof over their heads, many families can’t make ends meet.

As President and CEO of NTFB and Board Chair for Feeding America, my work puts me on the front lines of the fight against hunger. I have seen the consequences of not having enough to eat.  Children are particularly vulnerable to these consequences, including adverse physical, behavioral and mental health effects due to insufficient nutrition. Through the study, we know we serve at least 125,000 children through our grocery/pantry programs; this doesn’t include the 11,000 children served through our Food 4 Kids program that provides backpacks with nutritious food for the weekend to chronically hungry children each Friday during the school year. As the new school year kicks off, we are reminded that the work we do to feed children is critical to the future of our community.

In addition, we’ve learned that many of the families we serve are facing health issues. Hunger in America 2014 found that 59 percent of households that use the NTFB network have a person with high blood pressure, and 33 percent report a member with diabetes. These conditions are only exacerbated by a lack of proper nutrition. Of the households who turn to NTFB’s network, 68 percent report having to choose between paying for food or paying for medical care.

Despite reports of declining unemployment rates and signs of a strengthening economy, NTFB and our agencies continue to see a persistent need.  Stagnant wages and underemployment play a role in this continuing struggle; the study finds that 73 percent of NTFB clients have incomes below the poverty level – for a family of four that means $23,850 or less.

These surprising new statistics are a wake-up call. We must work together to solve hunger in our community. We must work together so that families like Arnold’s and Roene’s have enough to eat. Take a stand against hunger. When you realize the true face of hunger in America and in North Texas, how can you remain silent?


Jan Pruitt is the President and CEO of the North Texas Food Bank and the Board Chair for Feeding America, a national hunger relief organization. Follow Jan on Twitter  and Facebook.


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August 05, 2014
by Lucas Campbell

Growing Benefits for Hungry Seniors

August 05, 2014
by Lucas Campbell
by Lucas Campbell, NTFB Social Services Team Lead of Senior Outreach

I have had the privilege of working at the North Texas Food Bank for the last 4 years, helping people understand and apply for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (formerly known as “food stamps”). And, while we have had great success and helped far more people than I ever could have imagined, it has been challenging to find a way to increase SNAP participation among hungry seniors.

Growing Benefits 300x235 Growing Benefits for Hungry Seniors

Seniors are a fast-growing population, as the baby boomer generation enters their senior years.  As this population grows, the concern also grows about their food security; according to Feeding America, in 2011, 4.8 million Americans over the age of 60 were food insecure.

Unfortunately, not all seniors who are food insecure are accessing the assistance they need.  In Dallas County alone, 57% of those seniors eligible for SNAP are not receiving it. That’s nearly 20,000 seniors who are missing out on the opportunity to have more food on the table.

Over time and through many honest conversations we discovered that the reason many of these seniors are hesitant to apply for SNAP is due to the misconceptions they have about what used to be called the “food stamps” program.

Here are some common misconceptions we hear from seniors:

  • “It’s embarrassing to use Food Stamps.”
  • “I don’t want a handout from the government.”
  • “I don’t want to take away from someone else who needs it.”
  • “It’s not worth it, if I’m only going to get $16 a month.”

Here are some reasons why we know that these misconceptions are inaccurate:

  • The SNAP program is not like the old Food Stamp Program. You no longer have to pull out a book of stamps, or use coupons to pay for your food. SNAP benefits come on an EBT (electronic benefits transfer) card. It’s very discreet. The people behind you in line don’t even know you’re using it. Lone Star Card Growing Benefits for Hungry Seniors
  • SNAP is funded by tax payer dollars, just like Social Security. If you’ve paid taxes, you’ve paid into the SNAP program.
  • Everyone that qualifies for SNAP receives it. No one takes benefits away from anyone else. There are currently 1.7 billion dollars of unclaimed benefits.
  • The average individual SNAP benefit amount is $105. Even if you receive $16 per month, most people aren’t aware that you can let your benefits accumulate. You don’t have to spend it all in one month. If you let your card sit for 6 months, you’d have $96 on it! That’s a nice trip to the grocery store.
  • Medical expenses can also be used as a deduction if you are over the age of 60 or disabled. This could increase your benefit amount or even make the difference in whether or not you qualify.

We would be thankful to address all of these SNAP myths, but the challenge is getting the conversation started.  Most of these misgivings are so deeply rooted that we found it hard to even start the conversation.

For this very reason the Growing Benefits program was created early this year. Growing Benefits works to educate seniors about SNAP, to start the conversation, and we do that by educating them about gardening.

At first, SNAP and gardening might not sound like they have a lot of similarities, but people can actually buy seeds for a garden using SNAP benefits. SNAP can also be used to shop at farmer’s markets. We educate seniors on the benefits of growing their own food (indoors or outdoors). We talk about the physical benefits of eating healthier, social benefits of becoming involved in a community garden, and the financial benefits (because seeds are cheaper than produce).

While we have their ear, we also educate them about how they can grow their SNAP benefits. We break down the myths and eliminate the barriers that keep so many seniors from applying. Growing Benefits is a great way to make sure that no one gets left out, because the fight against hunger becomes a little easier when people understand the resources available to them.

The Growing Benefits program is always in need of volunteers. We need everyone from gardeners willing to share their expertise, to people who can spend an hour putting information packets together. If you’d like to get involved, or just want more information on the Growing Benefits or SNAP outreach, visit the NTFB Volunteer page at www.ntfb.org/volunteer and look for “Social Services Outreach” or email snap@ntfb.org.

If you need assistance accessing food in the Dallas and surrounding areas, visit www.ntfb.org/snap.

by Lucas Campbell, NTFB Social Services Team Lead of Senior Outreach

I have had the privilege of working at the North Texas Food Bank for the last 4 years, helping people understand and apply for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (formerly known as “food stamps”). And, while we have had great success and helped far more people than I ever could have imagined, it has been challenging to find a way to increase SNAP participation among hungry seniors.

Growing Benefits 300x235 Growing Benefits for Hungry Seniors

Seniors are a fast-growing population, as the baby boomer generation enters their senior years.  As this population grows, the concern also grows about their food security; according to Feeding America, in 2011, 4.8 million Americans over the age of 60 were food insecure.

Unfortunately, not all seniors who are food insecure are accessing the assistance they need.  In Dallas County alone, 57% of those seniors eligible for SNAP are not receiving it. That’s nearly 20,000 seniors who are missing out on the opportunity to have more food on the table.

Over time and through many honest conversations we discovered that the reason many of these seniors are hesitant to apply for SNAP is due to the misconceptions they have about what used to be called the “food stamps” program.

Here are some common misconceptions we hear from seniors:

  • “It’s embarrassing to use Food Stamps.”
  • “I don’t want a handout from the government.”
  • “I don’t want to take away from someone else who needs it.”
  • “It’s not worth it, if I’m only going to get $16 a month.”

Here are some reasons why we know that these misconceptions are inaccurate:

  • The SNAP program is not like the old Food Stamp Program. You no longer have to pull out a book of stamps, or use coupons to pay for your food. SNAP benefits come on an EBT (electronic benefits transfer) card. It’s very discreet. The people behind you in line don’t even know you’re using it. Lone Star Card Growing Benefits for Hungry Seniors
  • SNAP is funded by tax payer dollars, just like Social Security. If you’ve paid taxes, you’ve paid into the SNAP program.
  • Everyone that qualifies for SNAP receives it. No one takes benefits away from anyone else. There are currently 1.7 billion dollars of unclaimed benefits.
  • The average individual SNAP benefit amount is $105. Even if you receive $16 per month, most people aren’t aware that you can let your benefits accumulate. You don’t have to spend it all in one month. If you let your card sit for 6 months, you’d have $96 on it! That’s a nice trip to the grocery store.
  • Medical expenses can also be used as a deduction if you are over the age of 60 or disabled. This could increase your benefit amount or even make the difference in whether or not you qualify.

We would be thankful to address all of these SNAP myths, but the challenge is getting the conversation started.  Most of these misgivings are so deeply rooted that we found it hard to even start the conversation.

For this very reason the Growing Benefits program was created early this year. Growing Benefits works to educate seniors about SNAP, to start the conversation, and we do that by educating them about gardening.

At first, SNAP and gardening might not sound like they have a lot of similarities, but people can actually buy seeds for a garden using SNAP benefits. SNAP can also be used to shop at farmer’s markets. We educate seniors on the benefits of growing their own food (indoors or outdoors). We talk about the physical benefits of eating healthier, social benefits of becoming involved in a community garden, and the financial benefits (because seeds are cheaper than produce).

While we have their ear, we also educate them about how they can grow their SNAP benefits. We break down the myths and eliminate the barriers that keep so many seniors from applying. Growing Benefits is a great way to make sure that no one gets left out, because the fight against hunger becomes a little easier when people understand the resources available to them.

The Growing Benefits program is always in need of volunteers. We need everyone from gardeners willing to share their expertise, to people who can spend an hour putting information packets together. If you’d like to get involved, or just want more information on the Growing Benefits or SNAP outreach, visit the NTFB Volunteer page at www.ntfb.org/volunteer and look for “Social Services Outreach” or email snap@ntfb.org.

If you need assistance accessing food in the Dallas and surrounding areas, visit www.ntfb.org/snap.


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July 15, 2014
by Diana Carranza

July 15 – National Call-In Day for H.R. 4719

July 15, 2014
by Diana Carranza

 
This week, Congress will vote on legislation that would improve federal tax incentives for donating food and funds to food banks and other nonprofits. Help us make sure NTFB and food banks across the country have the resources they need to help struggling Americans by calling your Representative today!

H.R. 4719 300x300 July 15   National Call In Day for H.R. 4719
Call 1-888-398-8702 and enter your zip code when prompted to connect to your Representative. Tell them this important message:

“[Share your name and city.] As your constituent and supporter of the North Texas Food Bank, I am calling you today to ask you to support H.R. 4719, the food donation tax legislation that would help our food bank feed struggling Americans. Please support this and other charitable giving tax legislation that would help ensure our food bank has the food and the funds needed to continue supporting those in need in our community.”

Then help us further by SHARING this post! Thanks as always for your support of the fight against hunger in North Texas!
 
Click here for more information on H.R. 4719: Fighting Hunger Incentive Act of 2014 .
 
Read the Letter that Feeding America sent to Congress.
 
 

 
This week, Congress will vote on legislation that would improve federal tax incentives for donating food and funds to food banks and other nonprofits. Help us make sure NTFB and food banks across the country have the resources they need to help struggling Americans by calling your Representative today!

H.R. 4719 300x300 July 15   National Call In Day for H.R. 4719
Call 1-888-398-8702 and enter your zip code when prompted to connect to your Representative. Tell them this important message:

“[Share your name and city.] As your constituent and supporter of the North Texas Food Bank, I am calling you today to ask you to support H.R. 4719, the food donation tax legislation that would help our food bank feed struggling Americans. Please support this and other charitable giving tax legislation that would help ensure our food bank has the food and the funds needed to continue supporting those in need in our community.”

Then help us further by SHARING this post! Thanks as always for your support of the fight against hunger in North Texas!
 
Click here for more information on H.R. 4719: Fighting Hunger Incentive Act of 2014 .
 
Read the Letter that Feeding America sent to Congress.
 
 


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June 23, 2014
by Diana Carranza

Fighting Hunger this Summer

June 23, 2014
by Diana Carranza
by Diana Carranza, NTFB Communication Specialist

 
When I think of summer, like so many people I can’t help but think of pools and parks, snow cones and ice cream, summer camp and fun in the sun!   Some of my own favorite childhood memories come from road trips that my family and I took during the summer.   (Five people piled into a car for hours wasn’t necessarily “fun” at the time, but it’s definitely a memory I won’t forget!)

With all the fun that summer can bring, it’s hard to think summer may not be fun for everyone.   The reality is that some families in our community are struggling more than usual this summer.

School cafeterias are closed which means that children who receive free or reduced meals during the school year may be missing meals.   It means that parents are working harder to stretch every last penny during June and July, even skipping their own meals, to make sure their kids have enough to eat. Sometimes though, even the best efforts don’t make ends meet.   And for parents with multiple children, this struggle is multiplied.

Summer hunger is a very real problem in our community:

  • 1 in 4 children in North Texas is food insecure (289,000 children).

Summer Meals Fighting Hunger this Summer

And the effects of summer hunger don’t end when school resumes in August:

 
At NTFB, we’re proud to partner with many organizations in the community to make sure these families and children have a place to turn for nutritious meals this summer.   Our Child-Feeding Programs team at NTFB has been in overdrive over the past few weeks coordinating and planning to make sure children in our community have the meals they need.   In fact, this summer NTFB will distribute approximately 2,200 meals each weekday at our Kids Café sites.   We also distribute Food 4 Kids backpacks each Friday and make weekly produce distributions to enrolled children at these sites.

We’re able to do this only through the support of the North Texas community and together, we’re making great strides in the fight against hunger this summer!
 

(If you or someone you know needs help feeding a child this summer, visit www.summerfood.org or text FOODTX to 877-877 to locate a feeding site near you.)

by Diana Carranza, NTFB Communication Specialist

 
When I think of summer, like so many people I can’t help but think of pools and parks, snow cones and ice cream, summer camp and fun in the sun!   Some of my own favorite childhood memories come from road trips that my family and I took during the summer.   (Five people piled into a car for hours wasn’t necessarily “fun” at the time, but it’s definitely a memory I won’t forget!)

With all the fun that summer can bring, it’s hard to think summer may not be fun for everyone.   The reality is that some families in our community are struggling more than usual this summer.

School cafeterias are closed which means that children who receive free or reduced meals during the school year may be missing meals.   It means that parents are working harder to stretch every last penny during June and July, even skipping their own meals, to make sure their kids have enough to eat. Sometimes though, even the best efforts don’t make ends meet.   And for parents with multiple children, this struggle is multiplied.

Summer hunger is a very real problem in our community:

  • 1 in 4 children in North Texas is food insecure (289,000 children).

Summer Meals Fighting Hunger this Summer

And the effects of summer hunger don’t end when school resumes in August:

 
At NTFB, we’re proud to partner with many organizations in the community to make sure these families and children have a place to turn for nutritious meals this summer.   Our Child-Feeding Programs team at NTFB has been in overdrive over the past few weeks coordinating and planning to make sure children in our community have the meals they need.   In fact, this summer NTFB will distribute approximately 2,200 meals each weekday at our Kids Café sites.   We also distribute Food 4 Kids backpacks each Friday and make weekly produce distributions to enrolled children at these sites.

We’re able to do this only through the support of the North Texas community and together, we’re making great strides in the fight against hunger this summer!
 

(If you or someone you know needs help feeding a child this summer, visit www.summerfood.org or text FOODTX to 877-877 to locate a feeding site near you.)


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April 23, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Asset Poverty – Texas Ranked 41st

April 23, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
children-with-backpacks

According to the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), a Washington, D.C. based non-profit that promotes programs for the low and moderate income households, Texas is ranked 41st in what states are doing to assist residents build and protect their assets. This was reported by the CFED and the Dallas Morning News, January 2014.

The facts according to CFED are as follows:

*Although Texas reports job growth and relatively low unemployment rates, residents are still struggling with financial insecurity and a slow movement up the economic ladder.

* One half of all Texas households is in a “persistent state of financial insecurity” and lives in “liquid asset poverty.”

*The current official poverty line is slightly over $23,000 for a family of four.

*The national average for the liquid poverty rate is 43.5 percent and Texas is higher at 49.8 percent.

*Twenty-eight percent of jobs in Texas are considered low-wage jobs.

*Twenty-five percent of Texas residents don’t have health insurance which is almost ten percent higher than the national average of 16.9 percent.

*The national average of net worth is $70,359 per family compared to the median net worth of a family in Texas is $53,452.

*There are also households in Texas that have a zero net worth.

CFED suggests there are ways to reverse these statistics for Texas. The barriers need to be removed for household savings and asset building for these Texans. All families should be able to open college savings accounts without having to use the payday lending and auto-title lending in order to do so.

Food bankers understand these statistics and realize that uninsured Texans have higher health care costs, yet have less money available for food. The low-wage earners lack sustainable healthy foods or complete food options, therefore relying on social welfare programs and food banks. The cycle will continue as it is often shared amongst family members. If a child has grown up relying on long-term social welfare for food and other necessities, they are more like to be on similar programs as adults. Whereas, a child that did not grow up accustomed to asset poverty or a low-wage environment is less likely to rely on welfare assistance.

According to the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), a Washington, D.C. based non-profit that promotes programs for the low and moderate income households, Texas is ranked 41st in what states are doing to assist residents build and protect their assets. This was reported by the CFED and the Dallas Morning News, January 2014.

The facts according to CFED are as follows:

*Although Texas reports job growth and relatively low unemployment rates, residents are still struggling with financial insecurity and a slow movement up the economic ladder.

* One half of all Texas households is in a “persistent state of financial insecurity” and lives in “liquid asset poverty.”

*The current official poverty line is slightly over $23,000 for a family of four.

*The national average for the liquid poverty rate is 43.5 percent and Texas is higher at 49.8 percent.

*Twenty-eight percent of jobs in Texas are considered low-wage jobs.

*Twenty-five percent of Texas residents don’t have health insurance which is almost ten percent higher than the national average of 16.9 percent.

*The national average of net worth is $70,359 per family compared to the median net worth of a family in Texas is $53,452.

*There are also households in Texas that have a zero net worth.

CFED suggests there are ways to reverse these statistics for Texas. The barriers need to be removed for household savings and asset building for these Texans. All families should be able to open college savings accounts without having to use the payday lending and auto-title lending in order to do so.

Food bankers understand these statistics and realize that uninsured Texans have higher health care costs, yet have less money available for food. The low-wage earners lack sustainable healthy foods or complete food options, therefore relying on social welfare programs and food banks. The cycle will continue as it is often shared amongst family members. If a child has grown up relying on long-term social welfare for food and other necessities, they are more like to be on similar programs as adults. Whereas, a child that did not grow up accustomed to asset poverty or a low-wage environment is less likely to rely on welfare assistance.


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April 14, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Spring Volunteer Opportunities

April 14, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
one-starfish-at-a-time

The North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) needs volunteers during the week to sort and package food throughout the spring months. These weekday shifts are an excellent opportunity for youth organizations, charitable organizations, businesses and local donors to engage with the NTFB. Not only are these volunteers making a great contribution to the NTFB organization, they are learning to understand a great volunteer experience while giving back to their community. If we don’t have enough volunteers, the food does not get sorted and boxed up properly, it won’t reach the Partner Agencies that serve the hungry clients. These shifts are available from Tuesday through Friday of each week. You can choose from the morning shift that is from 9:00-11:30 a.m. or the afternoon shift which is from 1:00-3:30 p.m. If you are interested in learning more about the NTFB and volunteering, you can call 214-270-2055 or you can email volunteer@ntfb.org. We appreciate your support.

 

NTFB statistics:

*$1.00 donated equals 3 meals.

*Demand for food is up, the economy is recovering but those that need it most, feel the recovery last.

*40 percent of the clients at our Partner Agencies report that they have to choose between receiving food or medical care.

*1 in 5 people in Dallas County are food insecure, 458,000 people.

*The faces of hunger are people just like us. These are people we work with daily, it is our family members, our friends, and it might be someone you walk past everyday in your ordinary walk of life. These are not just the people on the street corner holding a cardboard sign, it is all around us. Only 9 percent of our food goes to shelters and soup kitchens, yet statistics show that 20% of the people in Dallas are food insecure. This is why we need to be more diligent about making this food available to those who need it.

The North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) needs volunteers during the week to sort and package food throughout the spring months. These weekday shifts are an excellent opportunity for youth organizations, charitable organizations, businesses and local donors to engage with the NTFB. Not only are these volunteers making a great contribution to the NTFB organization, they are learning to understand a great volunteer experience while giving back to their community. If we don’t have enough volunteers, the food does not get sorted and boxed up properly, it won’t reach the Partner Agencies that serve the hungry clients. These shifts are available from Tuesday through Friday of each week. You can choose from the morning shift that is from 9:00-11:30 a.m. or the afternoon shift which is from 1:00-3:30 p.m. If you are interested in learning more about the NTFB and volunteering, you can call 214-270-2055 or you can email volunteer@ntfb.org. We appreciate your support.

 

NTFB statistics:

*$1.00 donated equals 3 meals.

*Demand for food is up, the economy is recovering but those that need it most, feel the recovery last.

*40 percent of the clients at our Partner Agencies report that they have to choose between receiving food or medical care.

*1 in 5 people in Dallas County are food insecure, 458,000 people.

*The faces of hunger are people just like us. These are people we work with daily, it is our family members, our friends, and it might be someone you walk past everyday in your ordinary walk of life. These are not just the people on the street corner holding a cardboard sign, it is all around us. Only 9 percent of our food goes to shelters and soup kitchens, yet statistics show that 20% of the people in Dallas are food insecure. This is why we need to be more diligent about making this food available to those who need it.


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March 20, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Child Obesity:
Different Fight, Same Objective

March 20, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Screen Shot 2014-02-13 at 1.57.43 PM

Some could argue child obesity is of no concern to North Texas Food Bank. After all, as long as obese children have food to eat, NTFB’s job is done, right? As a matter of fact, nothing could be farther from the truth. In our fight against hunger, our goal is to make food insecure North Texans healthier, smarter and stronger. That means our job is only done when food insecure families are provided with healthy food that will make them smarter and stronger.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), high prices for fresh fruits and vegetables increase the risk that low and middle income children will be overweight. HHS researchers also found that higher fast food prices were associated with obesity as fast foods chains are more likely to boost prices based on greater demand. Read More

Some could argue child obesity is of no concern to North Texas Food Bank. After all, as long as obese children have food to eat, NTFB’s job is done, right? As a matter of fact, nothing could be farther from the truth. In our fight against hunger, our goal is to make food insecure North Texans healthier, smarter and stronger. That means our job is only done when food insecure families are provided with healthy food that will make them smarter and stronger.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), high prices for fresh fruits and vegetables increase the risk that low and middle income children will be overweight. HHS researchers also found that higher fast food prices were associated with obesity as fast foods chains are more likely to boost prices based on greater demand. Read More


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March 17, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

March is National Nutrition Month for
Feeding America & NTFB

March 17, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Nutrition Month

The month of March holds a high significance to National Nutrition Month. While North Texas Food Bank and Feeding America hold nutrition in high regard every month, the two organizations (among others) will specifically emphasize good nutrition and the availability of nutritious meals throughout the NTFB service area, as well as nationally through the Feeding America network. Read More

The month of March holds a high significance to National Nutrition Month. While North Texas Food Bank and Feeding America hold nutrition in high regard every month, the two organizations (among others) will specifically emphasize good nutrition and the availability of nutritious meals throughout the NTFB service area, as well as nationally through the Feeding America network. Read More


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