July 15, 2014
by Diana Carranza

June 15 – National Call-In Day for H.R. 4719

July 15, 2014
by Diana Carranza

 
This week, Congress will vote on legislation that would improve federal tax incentives for donating food and funds to food banks and other nonprofits. Help us make sure NTFB and food banks across the country have the resources they need to help struggling Americans by calling your Representative today!

H.R. 4719 300x300 June 15   National Call In Day for H.R. 4719
Call 1-888-398-8702 and enter your zip code when prompted to connect to your Representative. Tell them this important message:

“[Share your name and city.] As your constituent and supporter of the North Texas Food Bank, I am calling you today to ask you to support H.R. 4719, the food donation tax legislation that would help our food bank feed struggling Americans. Please support this and other charitable giving tax legislation that would help ensure our food bank has the food and the funds needed to continue supporting those in need in our community.”

Then help us further by SHARING this post! Thanks as always for your support of the fight against hunger in North Texas!
 
Click here for more information on H.R. 4719: Fighting Hunger Incentive Act of 2014 .
 
Read the Letter that Feeding America sent to Congress.
 
 

 
This week, Congress will vote on legislation that would improve federal tax incentives for donating food and funds to food banks and other nonprofits. Help us make sure NTFB and food banks across the country have the resources they need to help struggling Americans by calling your Representative today!

H.R. 4719 300x300 June 15   National Call In Day for H.R. 4719
Call 1-888-398-8702 and enter your zip code when prompted to connect to your Representative. Tell them this important message:

“[Share your name and city.] As your constituent and supporter of the North Texas Food Bank, I am calling you today to ask you to support H.R. 4719, the food donation tax legislation that would help our food bank feed struggling Americans. Please support this and other charitable giving tax legislation that would help ensure our food bank has the food and the funds needed to continue supporting those in need in our community.”

Then help us further by SHARING this post! Thanks as always for your support of the fight against hunger in North Texas!
 
Click here for more information on H.R. 4719: Fighting Hunger Incentive Act of 2014 .
 
Read the Letter that Feeding America sent to Congress.
 
 


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June 23, 2014
by Diana Carranza

Fighting Hunger this Summer

June 23, 2014
by Diana Carranza
by Diana Carranza, NTFB Communication Specialist

 
When I think of summer, like so many people I can’t help but think of pools and parks, snow cones and ice cream, summer camp and fun in the sun!   Some of my own favorite childhood memories come from road trips that my family and I took during the summer.   (Five people piled into a car for hours wasn’t necessarily “fun” at the time, but it’s definitely a memory I won’t forget!)

With all the fun that summer can bring, it’s hard to think summer may not be fun for everyone.   The reality is that some families in our community are struggling more than usual this summer.

School cafeterias are closed which means that children who receive free or reduced meals during the school year may be missing meals.   It means that parents are working harder to stretch every last penny during June and July, even skipping their own meals, to make sure their kids have enough to eat. Sometimes though, even the best efforts don’t make ends meet.   And for parents with multiple children, this struggle is multiplied.

Summer hunger is a very real problem in our community:

  • 1 in 4 children in North Texas is food insecure (289,000 children).

Summer Meals Fighting Hunger this Summer

And the effects of summer hunger don’t end when school resumes in August:

 
At NTFB, we’re proud to partner with many organizations in the community to make sure these families and children have a place to turn for nutritious meals this summer.   Our Child-Feeding Programs team at NTFB has been in overdrive over the past few weeks coordinating and planning to make sure children in our community have the meals they need.   In fact, this summer NTFB will distribute approximately 2,200 meals each weekday at our Kids Café sites.   We also distribute Food 4 Kids backpacks each Friday and make weekly produce distributions to enrolled children at these sites.

We’re able to do this only through the support of the North Texas community and together, we’re making great strides in the fight against hunger this summer!
 

(If you or someone you know needs help feeding a child this summer, visit www.summerfood.org or text FOODTX to 877-877 to locate a feeding site near you.)

by Diana Carranza, NTFB Communication Specialist

 
When I think of summer, like so many people I can’t help but think of pools and parks, snow cones and ice cream, summer camp and fun in the sun!   Some of my own favorite childhood memories come from road trips that my family and I took during the summer.   (Five people piled into a car for hours wasn’t necessarily “fun” at the time, but it’s definitely a memory I won’t forget!)

With all the fun that summer can bring, it’s hard to think summer may not be fun for everyone.   The reality is that some families in our community are struggling more than usual this summer.

School cafeterias are closed which means that children who receive free or reduced meals during the school year may be missing meals.   It means that parents are working harder to stretch every last penny during June and July, even skipping their own meals, to make sure their kids have enough to eat. Sometimes though, even the best efforts don’t make ends meet.   And for parents with multiple children, this struggle is multiplied.

Summer hunger is a very real problem in our community:

  • 1 in 4 children in North Texas is food insecure (289,000 children).

Summer Meals Fighting Hunger this Summer

And the effects of summer hunger don’t end when school resumes in August:

 
At NTFB, we’re proud to partner with many organizations in the community to make sure these families and children have a place to turn for nutritious meals this summer.   Our Child-Feeding Programs team at NTFB has been in overdrive over the past few weeks coordinating and planning to make sure children in our community have the meals they need.   In fact, this summer NTFB will distribute approximately 2,200 meals each weekday at our Kids Café sites.   We also distribute Food 4 Kids backpacks each Friday and make weekly produce distributions to enrolled children at these sites.

We’re able to do this only through the support of the North Texas community and together, we’re making great strides in the fight against hunger this summer!
 

(If you or someone you know needs help feeding a child this summer, visit www.summerfood.org or text FOODTX to 877-877 to locate a feeding site near you.)


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April 23, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Asset Poverty – Texas Ranked 41st

April 23, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
children-with-backpacks

According to the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), a Washington, D.C. based non-profit that promotes programs for the low and moderate income households, Texas is ranked 41st in what states are doing to assist residents build and protect their assets. This was reported by the CFED and the Dallas Morning News, January 2014.

The facts according to CFED are as follows:

*Although Texas reports job growth and relatively low unemployment rates, residents are still struggling with financial insecurity and a slow movement up the economic ladder.

* One half of all Texas households is in a “persistent state of financial insecurity” and lives in “liquid asset poverty.”

*The current official poverty line is slightly over $23,000 for a family of four.

*The national average for the liquid poverty rate is 43.5 percent and Texas is higher at 49.8 percent.

*Twenty-eight percent of jobs in Texas are considered low-wage jobs.

*Twenty-five percent of Texas residents don’t have health insurance which is almost ten percent higher than the national average of 16.9 percent.

*The national average of net worth is $70,359 per family compared to the median net worth of a family in Texas is $53,452.

*There are also households in Texas that have a zero net worth.

CFED suggests there are ways to reverse these statistics for Texas. The barriers need to be removed for household savings and asset building for these Texans. All families should be able to open college savings accounts without having to use the payday lending and auto-title lending in order to do so.

Food bankers understand these statistics and realize that uninsured Texans have higher health care costs, yet have less money available for food. The low-wage earners lack sustainable healthy foods or complete food options, therefore relying on social welfare programs and food banks. The cycle will continue as it is often shared amongst family members. If a child has grown up relying on long-term social welfare for food and other necessities, they are more like to be on similar programs as adults. Whereas, a child that did not grow up accustomed to asset poverty or a low-wage environment is less likely to rely on welfare assistance.

According to the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), a Washington, D.C. based non-profit that promotes programs for the low and moderate income households, Texas is ranked 41st in what states are doing to assist residents build and protect their assets. This was reported by the CFED and the Dallas Morning News, January 2014.

The facts according to CFED are as follows:

*Although Texas reports job growth and relatively low unemployment rates, residents are still struggling with financial insecurity and a slow movement up the economic ladder.

* One half of all Texas households is in a “persistent state of financial insecurity” and lives in “liquid asset poverty.”

*The current official poverty line is slightly over $23,000 for a family of four.

*The national average for the liquid poverty rate is 43.5 percent and Texas is higher at 49.8 percent.

*Twenty-eight percent of jobs in Texas are considered low-wage jobs.

*Twenty-five percent of Texas residents don’t have health insurance which is almost ten percent higher than the national average of 16.9 percent.

*The national average of net worth is $70,359 per family compared to the median net worth of a family in Texas is $53,452.

*There are also households in Texas that have a zero net worth.

CFED suggests there are ways to reverse these statistics for Texas. The barriers need to be removed for household savings and asset building for these Texans. All families should be able to open college savings accounts without having to use the payday lending and auto-title lending in order to do so.

Food bankers understand these statistics and realize that uninsured Texans have higher health care costs, yet have less money available for food. The low-wage earners lack sustainable healthy foods or complete food options, therefore relying on social welfare programs and food banks. The cycle will continue as it is often shared amongst family members. If a child has grown up relying on long-term social welfare for food and other necessities, they are more like to be on similar programs as adults. Whereas, a child that did not grow up accustomed to asset poverty or a low-wage environment is less likely to rely on welfare assistance.


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April 14, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Spring Volunteer Opportunities

April 14, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
one-starfish-at-a-time

The North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) needs volunteers during the week to sort and package food throughout the spring months. These weekday shifts are an excellent opportunity for youth organizations, charitable organizations, businesses and local donors to engage with the NTFB. Not only are these volunteers making a great contribution to the NTFB organization, they are learning to understand a great volunteer experience while giving back to their community. If we don’t have enough volunteers, the food does not get sorted and boxed up properly, it won’t reach the Partner Agencies that serve the hungry clients. These shifts are available from Tuesday through Friday of each week. You can choose from the morning shift that is from 9:00-11:30 a.m. or the afternoon shift which is from 1:00-3:30 p.m. If you are interested in learning more about the NTFB and volunteering, you can call 214-270-2055 or you can email volunteer@ntfb.org. We appreciate your support.

 

NTFB statistics:

*$1.00 donated equals 3 meals.

*Demand for food is up, the economy is recovering but those that need it most, feel the recovery last.

*40 percent of the clients at our Partner Agencies report that they have to choose between receiving food or medical care.

*1 in 5 people in Dallas County are food insecure, 458,000 people.

*The faces of hunger are people just like us. These are people we work with daily, it is our family members, our friends, and it might be someone you walk past everyday in your ordinary walk of life. These are not just the people on the street corner holding a cardboard sign, it is all around us. Only 9 percent of our food goes to shelters and soup kitchens, yet statistics show that 20% of the people in Dallas are food insecure. This is why we need to be more diligent about making this food available to those who need it.

The North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) needs volunteers during the week to sort and package food throughout the spring months. These weekday shifts are an excellent opportunity for youth organizations, charitable organizations, businesses and local donors to engage with the NTFB. Not only are these volunteers making a great contribution to the NTFB organization, they are learning to understand a great volunteer experience while giving back to their community. If we don’t have enough volunteers, the food does not get sorted and boxed up properly, it won’t reach the Partner Agencies that serve the hungry clients. These shifts are available from Tuesday through Friday of each week. You can choose from the morning shift that is from 9:00-11:30 a.m. or the afternoon shift which is from 1:00-3:30 p.m. If you are interested in learning more about the NTFB and volunteering, you can call 214-270-2055 or you can email volunteer@ntfb.org. We appreciate your support.

 

NTFB statistics:

*$1.00 donated equals 3 meals.

*Demand for food is up, the economy is recovering but those that need it most, feel the recovery last.

*40 percent of the clients at our Partner Agencies report that they have to choose between receiving food or medical care.

*1 in 5 people in Dallas County are food insecure, 458,000 people.

*The faces of hunger are people just like us. These are people we work with daily, it is our family members, our friends, and it might be someone you walk past everyday in your ordinary walk of life. These are not just the people on the street corner holding a cardboard sign, it is all around us. Only 9 percent of our food goes to shelters and soup kitchens, yet statistics show that 20% of the people in Dallas are food insecure. This is why we need to be more diligent about making this food available to those who need it.


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March 20, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Child Obesity:
Different Fight, Same Objective

March 20, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Screen Shot 2014-02-13 at 1.57.43 PM

Some could argue child obesity is of no concern to North Texas Food Bank. After all, as long as obese children have food to eat, NTFB’s job is done, right? As a matter of fact, nothing could be farther from the truth. In our fight against hunger, our goal is to make food insecure North Texans healthier, smarter and stronger. That means our job is only done when food insecure families are provided with healthy food that will make them smarter and stronger.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), high prices for fresh fruits and vegetables increase the risk that low and middle income children will be overweight. HHS researchers also found that higher fast food prices were associated with obesity as fast foods chains are more likely to boost prices based on greater demand. Read More

Some could argue child obesity is of no concern to North Texas Food Bank. After all, as long as obese children have food to eat, NTFB’s job is done, right? As a matter of fact, nothing could be farther from the truth. In our fight against hunger, our goal is to make food insecure North Texans healthier, smarter and stronger. That means our job is only done when food insecure families are provided with healthy food that will make them smarter and stronger.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), high prices for fresh fruits and vegetables increase the risk that low and middle income children will be overweight. HHS researchers also found that higher fast food prices were associated with obesity as fast foods chains are more likely to boost prices based on greater demand. Read More


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March 17, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

March is National Nutrition Month for
Feeding America & NTFB

March 17, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Nutrition Month

The month of March holds a high significance to National Nutrition Month. While North Texas Food Bank and Feeding America hold nutrition in high regard every month, the two organizations (among others) will specifically emphasize good nutrition and the availability of nutritious meals throughout the NTFB service area, as well as nationally through the Feeding America network. Read More

The month of March holds a high significance to National Nutrition Month. While North Texas Food Bank and Feeding America hold nutrition in high regard every month, the two organizations (among others) will specifically emphasize good nutrition and the availability of nutritious meals throughout the NTFB service area, as well as nationally through the Feeding America network. Read More


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March 03, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Breaking Down The Farm Bill and SNAP

March 03, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Screen Shot 2014-03-03 at 2.50.59 PM

In one of our most recent posts, we discussed the reality of child hunger in North Texas and across the U.S. It’s a common misconception that hunger only exists in far away third-world countries. However, hunger is a harsh reality that affects far too many families across the United States and in our own DFW community.

Most recently, changes to the Farm Bill will cut an additional $8.55 billion from SNAP benefits over the next ten years across 15 states. As an overview, the Farm Bill is a piece of legislation that governs America’s nutrition and agriculture policy including hunger-relief programs. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is funded by the Farm Bill. Dramatic cuts to SNAP ($8.55 billion) are being considered by Congress right now on top of cuts that already went into effect on November 1.  Read More

In one of our most recent posts, we discussed the reality of child hunger in North Texas and across the U.S. It’s a common misconception that hunger only exists in far away third-world countries. However, hunger is a harsh reality that affects far too many families across the United States and in our own DFW community.

Most recently, changes to the Farm Bill will cut an additional $8.55 billion from SNAP benefits over the next ten years across 15 states. As an overview, the Farm Bill is a piece of legislation that governs America’s nutrition and agriculture policy including hunger-relief programs. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is funded by the Farm Bill. Dramatic cuts to SNAP ($8.55 billion) are being considered by Congress right now on top of cuts that already went into effect on November 1.  Read More


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February 21, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

Make A Difference This February –
Empty Bowls Returns!

February 21, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
NTFB's Empty Bowls 2014

Welcome to an outdoor European market, culinary and art event nestled in the heart of the Dallas Performing Arts District – NTFB’s Empty Bowls (presented by Kroger) has returned and once again benefits NTFB!

Empty Bowls is the best ticket in town to partake in an open-air festival anchored by the gorgeous Meyerson Symphony Hall lobby. Enjoy an artfully nourishing lunch, music provided by the Youth Strings ensemble, hand-crafted pottery demonstrations, and fundraising opportunities to benefit North Texas Food Bank.
Read More

Welcome to an outdoor European market, culinary and art event nestled in the heart of the Dallas Performing Arts District – NTFB’s Empty Bowls (presented by Kroger) has returned and once again benefits NTFB!

Empty Bowls is the best ticket in town to partake in an open-air festival anchored by the gorgeous Meyerson Symphony Hall lobby. Enjoy an artfully nourishing lunch, music provided by the Youth Strings ensemble, hand-crafted pottery demonstrations, and fundraising opportunities to benefit North Texas Food Bank.
Read More


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February 14, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

No Child Hungry

February 14, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Screen Shot 2014-02-13 at 1.57.43 PM

February is home to Valentine’s Day – a day to honor your sweetheart, loved one or special friend. Why not spend the other 27 days reflecting on the future of our country: the children. Feeding America and NTFB firmly believe that investing in child nutrition programs is an investment in a healthier future.

It’s a common misconception that hunger only exists in far away third-world countries. However, hunger is a harsh reality that affects far too many families across the United States and in our own DFW community. Allow us to paint a picture of how real the fight against hunger is in North Texas today. Read More

February is home to Valentine’s Day – a day to honor your sweetheart, loved one or special friend. Why not spend the other 27 days reflecting on the future of our country: the children. Feeding America and NTFB firmly believe that investing in child nutrition programs is an investment in a healthier future.

It’s a common misconception that hunger only exists in far away third-world countries. However, hunger is a harsh reality that affects far too many families across the United States and in our own DFW community. Allow us to paint a picture of how real the fight against hunger is in North Texas today. Read More


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January 30, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank

NTFB CEO JAN PRUITT NAMED AS NEW
CHAIR-ELECT OF FEEDING AMERICA

January 30, 2014
by North Texas Food Bank
Jan Pruitt

Bob Aiken, CEO of Feeding America, came to visit North Texas Food Bank last year in December. During his visit, Bob made an exciting announcement that NTFB’s very own President and CEO, Jan Pruitt, has been named as the new Chair-elect of Feeding America!

Pruitt has been an advocate of Feeding America for quite some time now, and sees to it that NTFB participates in supporting Feeding America’s large-scale goals and initiatives throughout each year. Read More

Bob Aiken, CEO of Feeding America, came to visit North Texas Food Bank last year in December. During his visit, Bob made an exciting announcement that NTFB’s very own President and CEO, Jan Pruitt, has been named as the new Chair-elect of Feeding America!

Pruitt has been an advocate of Feeding America for quite some time now, and sees to it that NTFB participates in supporting Feeding America’s large-scale goals and initiatives throughout each year. Read More


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